HOW NOT TO DO IT.

HOW NOT TO DO IT.

Allowing for a slight suspicion of exaggeration and yielding to a temptation to make his statements more readable by the infusion of a modicum of smart writing, there is probably more truth than poetry in the following account of how-not-to-do-it is practised by some of the British volunteer fire brigades. The one in question had been organised for only a short time, its captain, like his men and the elected committee, was a greenhorn. Pending the building of stables, the horses were kept in a shed in a field. Then a fire broke out one night. The fireman “on duty” had gone to bed, and was aroused with difficulty. He hurried off to report to his captain, who severely reprimanded him for appearing before bis superior officer improperly dressed, and sent him home to put his bright brass helmet on. The fire was at the time blazing cheerfully. The captain and his men went to the field where the horses had been put, to find they had broken out of the shed, as some one had forgotten to feed them. After several fruitless attempts to catch the horses, one of the firemen, who in the daytime is a greengrocer, suggested a bunch of carrots as a lure. But he did not reside at his shop, and, in order to get the carrots, had to go home for the keys. The fire was now burning brilliantly. The horses would not approach the carrots, and then the brigade themselves dragged the engine to the fire, which had by this time nearly burned itself out. But the captain, keen to show what his men could do, impetuously attempted to attach the hose to the vas main!

Pittsburg, Pa., will tear down No. 7 fire house and build a new one at a cost of $20,0002.

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