HUNTING WATER IN AFRICA.

HUNTING WATER IN AFRICA.

Drilling for water in Cape Colony. Africa, for stock-breeding and purposes of irrigation was first undertaken by the British government for thy farmers at minimum cost. The government owned the drilling machinery and trained men for operating it. Now the government encourages well-drilling by giving subsidies equal to not more than one-half the cost of drilling the wells, and the work is undertaken by contractors who have their own drilling machinery and employ most of the men previously trained by the government for operating the machines. The equipment used for drilling is mostly the jumper type drill. Several of these are of American manufacture. The average depth to which it is usually necessary to drill is about 300 ft., at an average cost of $3.89 per foot. The statement is made that a new machine made in Cape Town nas drilled as much as 126 ft. in sixty-four hours, all rock drilling. It is designed to drill a 6-in. hole to a depth of 500 ft. with a steampower percussion-drill. The owners of large farm properties find American-made drilling machinery and also windmills preferable to those of British manufacture. l>ecause the parts are standardised—making it easy to replace parts, and that the claim of the British manufacturer that his machines were supported in higher prices by greater lasting power was not a good contention. The American machines lasted quite long enough, and better results could be obtained by replacing them every five or six years with newer types, their lower cost permitting this to be done.

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