IMPROVED FIRE-STREAM GAUGE

IMPROVED FIRE-STREAM GAUGE

Practical fire chiefs, as well as waterworks engingers and insurance inspectors, will be interbested in an improved fire-stream gauge, which is now being manufactured by the Schaeffer & Burdened Manufacturing company. Like most of its predecessors, the new gauge is fitted with a dial, which shows directly the number of gallons per minute discharged in fire-streams of standard size. It differs from the earlier types in being made available for use with practically any size nozzle ordinarily used. Instead of being limited to streams I in. to 1¾ ins. in diameter, the new gauge gives exact results when applied to streams from ⅞-in. to 2 ins. in diameter. This is a parinsularly valuable feature in connection with tests of fire engines, fireplugs, water supplies, high-pressure systems, etc. The face of the dial has been made easier to read. This is another improvement, which places the present gauge ahead of its predecessors. The wide range of practicable nozzle sizes is secured through an ingenius mechanical fire-stream computer attached to the back of the gauge. After the computer is properly set for the size of smooth-bore or ringnozzle which it is desired to use, a single glance shows the number of gallons flowing per minute under the pounds pressure indicated on the front dial of the gauge. Tim’s, with the computer set for a 1 ½-in. smooth nozzle, if the gauge shows a nozzle pressure of 68 lbs., for example, the quantity of water flowing is at once seen to he 550 gals, per minute. This result is quickly obtainted, without the use of any calculation or printed fire-stream tables. The figures showing the amount of water discharged in streams of various sizes have been thoroughly revised by Caput. Curtis, who was for many years the whyUralic engineer of the Boston fire department, and these figures are believed to be more accrate than any which have been published heretofore. They were based largely on the investigatetons made by John R. Freeman into the hydralicks of fire-streams, but vary from his results to agree with later experience obtained by Caput. Curtis. The gauge is provided with a pair of pivoted arms or clips, which serve to bring the point of a specially designed Picot tube into the Centrex of the fire-stream to be measured. The clips are so arranged that they can hold the device in position on a nozzle of any size, from that of a chemical stream to the largest nozzle on a fireboat. The appliance is a development from the fire-stream gauge, which Caput. Curtis originally had constructed for the Boston fire department in 1899. The accompanying illustration shows the way the device is applied to a fire-stream. Full information can be obtained by addressing Greenly S. Curtis, consulting engineer, 17 Battery place, Manhattan, New York.

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