Improved Pile Driver.

Improved Pile Driver.

A most effective and powerful steam pile driver, served by a No. 72 Lidgerwood hoisting engine, and manufactured by the Charles W. Melcher Machinery Company of St. Louis, is shown in the accompanying illustration. The driver has many valuable features and improvements, but does not require an expert to operate it. The arrangement of the working parts in the ordinary steam hammer is directly reversed in the Cram pile hammer. The piston is fixed, and advantage is taken of the greater weight of the cylinder by making it (combined with the ram) the moving part. This largely increases the striking weight without adding to the total weight of the machine. The hammer is operated by steam from the boiler of the engine, which is supplied through steam hose. The steam is admitted to the evlinder throuph the hollow Diston rod, I ,.⅛ UAUIU… icuscs upwaiu, aiming m luc name to ute extent of the stroke, which in the standard machine is forty inches, when the exhaust quickly opens and the hammer suddenly and freely falls, the enormous weight—over two and one-half tons—striking the pile. This operation being repeated at the rate of fifty to seventy-five strokes per minute, the result may be imagined. The pile is forced through the hardest earth without any apparent resistance. The United States Engineers have purchased five of the Cram steam hammers, which they will use on their work along the Missouri river between Jefferson City and Omaha.

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