Improvements at Canyon City.

Improvements at Canyon City.

Cañon City, Colo., owns approximately 45 cu. ft. of water in the Arkansas river, 35 of which it holds under decrees granted more than forty years ago. The other 10 ft. has never been decreed; but the city can easily establish its right and ownership to it at any time it desires. The city owns 14 cu. ft. of water coming out of Cottonwood creek; the remaining 21 cu. ft. represent its interests in the flow of the Cañon Hydraulic and Fruitlands ditches. The plans provide for a 24-in. pipe-line extending up into the Royal Gorge and debouching into a series of settling-basins, connected with a storage-reservoir of something like 75.000,000-gal. capacity located on the Alpine heights, a mile or so north of town, from which the water would be fed directly into the citymains “by gravity. The intake on the river would be approximately 8 miles from the city, or, perhaps, 1 mile and a half above Hanging bridge. The pipe-line would, probably, be brought down through the Royal Gorge on the grade of the old State ditch. The pipe-line will run along the eastern slope of the Hogback to the three settlingbasins, which will be built one above the other, the lower one to connect with the reservoir. A 24-in. pipe will carry from 12 to 15 cu. ft. of water per second of time—a quantity many times sufficient for the present population of the city, whose consumption of water at this season of the year is but little in excess of 1 cu. ft. The contemplated gravity system, therefore, will be vastly in excess of the pumping plant, which is so nearly worn out as to necessitate very expensive repairs unless some other system of procuring water is devised. The additional 14 cu. ft. of water under the gravity system will be more than enough for irrigation purposes and will yield the city a good annual revenue, besides paying the cost of maintaining the water system and interest on the bonds issued for its construction. Water consumers under the new order of things will have all the water they want, whether for household uses or irrigation purposes. I he reservoir, which will be in the little valley between the Hogback proper and the socalled Pigbacks along its eastern slope, will be high enough to afford a heavy pressure in all parts of the city. In fact, even in Lincoln Park or the grounds of the Natatorium, if necessary. The construction will be easy. Almost all that will have to be done will be to build a dam across one end of the little valley. The capacity of the reservoir can be increased indefinitely by raising the height of the dam. There will be a filtration plant at the end of the pipe-line, and the water will have to pass through it before reaching the first of the trio of settling-basins.

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