IMPROVEMENTS AT WILMINGTON.

IMPROVEMENTS AT WILMINGTON.

Important Waterworks Construction Under Way.

Chief Engineer Joseph A. Bond, of the waterworks at Wilmington, Del., keeps his plant right in the forefront of American systems. Financially his annual report (the thirty-second of the department since the system was built) shows a balance of $10,141.10. The system has likewise been considerably extended by laying 26,530 feet of pipe, 12,281 in the high-service distribution, and 14,421 in the low-service (5,892 feet replacing pipe of smaller diameter); 137 water gates and fourteen hydrants were added; 564 lead service pipes and seventy-three parts of services were put in. The Rockford tower, illustrated herewith, has also been completed and is now in full service A new Snow pumping engine (also illustrated herewith), is installed in the pumping station. There are now laid in the city 106.2 miles of main, thirty-inch to one-inch, of which there are 198,273 feet of four-inch, 136,912 of eight-inch ; 120,654 of six-inch ; 7,650 of thirty-inch; and 219 of one-inch. The total number of fire hydrants belonging to the city is 779. The total number of meters in use in the city is 812, of which 144 were placed in 1901; prior to that year there were 637 in use; 126 were taken out last year. They are of the following types: Thomson; Thomson Bee; Lambert; Trident; Hersey; Torrent; Union; Columbia: Nash; Gem; Empire; Crown; Worthington; Buffalo. It is expected that the 100 meters placed in dwellings last year as a test will prove a success and lead to the instalment of a much larger number; many customers are now asking for their use. The total receipts of the department for the year were §177,648.19; expenditures, $167,507.09. The pumpage from the Brandywine was 2,646,225,240 gallons—an increase of 116,902,380 over that of 1900; consumption through meters, 1,120,327,500 gallons—about 42.5 per cent, of the whole, the increased metered consumption about equaling the increased pumpage ; water repumped to highservice, 607,632,625 gallons, of which 10,627,499 gallons was the Rockford tower system—entirely domestic and showing a daily per capita consumption of 33.4 gallons a day; Elliott avenue tower service—also entirely domestic—5,626,945 gallons, dally per capita of 23.6 gallons. In this service, although the compressed air line did not freeze last year as in past years, an automatic electric pump has been installed in the tower to supplement the present source of supply. As the daily consumption from the Rodney street reservoir has exceeded its capacity, and increased storage at the same elevation has become a necessity, a tract of eighty-nine acres of land has been purchased for that purpose. Tne report recommends that, instead of spending money on patching up the third dam on tne Brandywine, a new dam be built lower down the stream. The Rockford tower, which, as has already been stated, is now finished, consists of a steel tank, forty feet in diameter and sixty feet high, resting upon concrete walls ten feet above the surrounding level. A heavy stone wall incloses it, between which and the tank there is a four-foot space occupied by an iron stairway. The wall is carried up to a floor level six feet above the top of the tank, and then in sixteen open sections or windows, arched for an observatory, about fourteen feet high to the steel and copper roof. Water is pumped into it by the new Snow pumping engine already mentioned front the high-level pumping station distant one mile and one-half from the tower.

CHIEF ENGINEER JOSEPH A. BOND.SNOW PUMPING ENGINE, WILMINGTON, DEL.

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