IMPROVEMENTS IN ST. PAUL’S WATER SYSTEM.

IMPROVEMENTS IN ST. PAUL’S WATER SYSTEM.

After having been constructed for some months water was first let into the new concrete conduit at St Paul’s, Minn., on January 1, 1896. This conduit connects Otter lake with the open conduit leading to Pleasant lake. By actual measurement it delivers over 18,000,000 galions of water in twenty-four hours—the amount being ascertained by a test which showed that ten inches in the level of Otter lakes furnished the 108,000,000 gallons in that time. The Otter lake supply has been shut off and held as reserve supply. A wooden forty-two-inch conduit has been built from the weir chamber on the above mentioned Otter lake conduit to Centerville lake—a much deeper lake, free from the vegetable growth found in Baldwin lake—the smallest, shallowest, and last of the Rice lakes chain —one source of the city’s supply. The Baldwin lake supply in now shut off. Twenty-eight artesian wells were sunk in the shores of Centerville lake, all connected by cast iron pipes, connected in their turn to a high duty pumping engine of 15,000.000 gallons daily capacity—itself connected to an intake pipe extending upwards of 1,000 feet into deep water in Centerville lake. The new supply can furnish daily 15,000,000 gallons of water—10,000,000 from the wells and the remainder from the lake. A new cast iron thirty six-inch force-main has been laid from the McCarron lake pumping station to the reservoir. There are now two mains across Rice Swamp, whereby the high service supply is doubly protected. There arc now three pumping engines as follows: One of $2,000,000 gallons capacity, one of 4,000,000; and one of 6,000,000. It is recommended that the first pump be sold and a new up-to date pumping engine of 10,000,000 gallons be substituted for it. The total cost of the water works to the present has been $3,758,857, to which the comptroler adds $1,360,913. The general water receipts, including high and low service and meters during thirteen months were $190,71478. There are 1,546 meters in service, of which 1,500 belong to the department—an increase of 437 in 1896.

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