Improving Fire Departments.

Improving Fire Departments.

Some years ago the Board of Fire Underwriters commissioned a very experienced retired officer of the fire department to visit all towns of the United States, and report upon the means of these places—in brigades, extinguishing appliances and water—of protection against fire. These inquisitions revealed a series of delinquencies on the part of public authorities. This was valuable information, but of no practical value if unapplied. If these exceptional towns and cities had been admonished that unless they afforded a protection against fire equal to its possible occurrence in such a population their premiums would be advanced and their risks canceled, they would have been wise enough to judge of the preferable alternative.« Three requirements are indispensable in the extinguishment of fires—an efficient brigade, appliances in full supply, and ample water; and if on$ of these is unavailable, as is often the case, it destroys the competency of the other two. The underwriters are probably now acting upon this information, which could have been more prudently and profitably used at a much earlier period.—Insurance Journal.

Improving Fire Departments.

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Improving Fire Departments.

Some years ago the Board of Fire Underwriters commissioned a very experienced retired officer of the fire department to visit all towns of the United States, and report upon the means of these places—in brigades, extinguishing appliances and water—of protection against fire. These inquisitions revealed a series of delinquencies on the part of public authorities. This was valuable information, but of no practical value if unapplied. If these exceptional towns and cities had been admonished that unless they afforded a protection against fire equal to its possible occurrence in such a population their premiums would be advanced and their risks canceled, they would have been wise enough to judge of the preferable alternative. Three requirements are indispensable in the extinguishment of fires—an efficient brigade, appliances in full supply, and ample water; and if one of these is unavailable, as is often the case, it destroys the competency of the other two. The underwriters are probably now acting upon this information, which could have been more prudently and profitably used at a much earlier period.—-Insurance Journal.

At the special election held at Hamilton, to decide the question as to whether the village shall build water works, the proposition was carried by 231 majority.

Water works are in process of building at Crisfieid, Middletown and I-onaconing. This affords a pleasing proof of the progress of Maryland towns.