Increasing Washington’s Water Supply

Increasing Washington’s Water Supply

A bill has been recommended by the District of Columbia Committee which accords with the budget estimate and provides for a further appropriation of $800,000. The project of increasing the water supply of the capital was authorized in the Army Appropriation Act for the fiscal year of 1922. The original estimate of the improvements cost was $9,523,000. A re-study and falling prices placed the total estimated and present authorized cost at $8,738,000. The latest total estimated cost, however, is $9,169,999. There has been appropriated to date for the work $3,200,000 and authority has been granted to incur obligations to the extent of $2,950,000 in excess of appropriations already made. In referring to the matter the committee reported as follows:

“The present supply of water is 70,000,000 gallons per day. The new system will supply 80,000,000 gallons per day additional. This will be accomplished by a new aqueduct running nearly parcllel to the present one from Great Falls to the Dalecarlia reservoir, which straddles the district line. At or in the immediate vicinity of this point additional water supply works are to be built which will be used for purifying and supplying water to all the high areas within the District of Columbia, where pumping is required to lift the water to the required elevation. These include a rapid sand filtration plant, a pumping station and a hydro-electric plant. The project also includes two new reservoirs, one to be located between the Dalecarlia reservoir and the bureau of standards and one a short distance to the eastward of the Georgetown reservoir, which lies alongside of the Conduit road a short distance out from Georgetown. The old filtration plant and McMillan Park reservoir will then be available solely for supplying the areas now served by gravity, and which consume, at the present time, about half of the present supply.

“It should be understood, however, that the new supply can be diverted wholly or partly either to the present system of distribution or to the high areas exclusively. It cannot, however, as at present projected, be delivered to the gravity supplied areas though the high areas. In this respect the project is deficient, because if any serious break should occur in the main conveying water to the McMillan Park filtration plant and reservoir the gravity supplied area would be without water until the break could be repaired.”

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