INSPECTION OF BUILDINGS AT NEWARK.

INSPECTION OF BUILDINGS AT NEWARK.

The members of the Newark. N. J., fire department have thoroughly familiarised themselves with the interior arrangement and contents of buildings in the city. This has been systematically brought about by Inspector C. Albert Gasser, chief officer of the bureau of combustibles and fire-risks, which is under the supervision of the fire commissioners. Well on to 2,000 reports have been filed in the office of that bureau in the city hall, each giving a dia gram and minute details as to the construction, interior arrangements and contents of a build ing which has been inspected. The valuable feature of the work lies in the further fact that duplicate copies of each report are in the house of the fire engine or truck company in the district in which the inspected building is located. The captain, lieutenant and privates of each compane arc supposed to have stiuli d the diagrams and accompanying information sufficiently to make themselves so familiar with any given building that, if they are called to it to extinguish a fire, they will approach it with an intelligent knowledge of every condition which they will meet. The contents of many of these reports have not been made public, some, because of their alarming nature; others, because they might work injury to private business interests. In every case, however, steps have been promptly taken to remedy dangerous conditions and to reduce the fire hazards. In some instances, the fire insurance men have been conferred with, and in not one case has a storekeeper or manufacturer or an ordinary householder shown any disposition to do anything hut aid in the work suggested for the safety of his own and surrounding property. Besides the regular inspectors, there have been spe cial inspections by the bureau because of specific complaints, and many buildings, which would have been positive deathtraps in the event of fire, have been so changed as to contfuction and contents that they are now comparatively safe. In no case, have the demands of the bureau put any burdensome costs upon the owner or occupant of a building, the changes being usually simple and inexpensive. The firemen and chief co-operate with the inspector in his work.

CAPT. M. W. JORDAN. Salvage Corps. Baltimore Md.DAVID E. BENEDICT. Fabric Fire Hose Co.

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