Intake of Corrugated Iron Culvert Pipe.

Intake of Corrugated Iron Culvert Pipe.

The Dutch Point Power Station at Hartford, Conn., which has a capacity of about 2,500 k.m., is being increased to about 17,600 k.w. The plant was originally built seven yaars ago by the Westinghouse, Church, Keer Company, of New York. which also did the supplementary work. Henry A. Kent, vice-president of the company, says of the plant: “While the location of the plant at Dutch Point is exceptionally advantageous, the discharge of a large city sewer entering the Connecticut river just above it has always fouled the condensing circulating water, and this became more and more objectionable as tne business of the company grew and the station load increased. The river is not more than 10 feet deep at low water where it flows past the plant, and the amount of solid matter which entered the intake or got through the screens and lodged in the condensers was so great and its character so offensive that the operation of cleaning them was not only disagreeable and unhealthy, but had to be repeated every few days. The original intake w’as provided with a screen chamber fitted with several sets of movable screens in the usual way which strained out so much solid matter that the flow’ of water through them was seriously obstructed and it was often difficult to get a supply adequate for the condensers, even though the screens were frequently cleaned. In connection with the recent enlargement of the plant to about 17,000 k.w. capacity it was decided to work out a plan of intake filtration which had proved successful on some of the western rivers though on a somewhat smaller scale. This was to utilize the sand of the river as a filter bed and was effected by sinking a crib 30 feet square and 9 feet high, below the surface of the river bottom. The crib then became a filter box surrounded by stone and covered with sand. In order to secure a suitable location for this crib it was found necessary to locate it about 500 feet out in the stream opposite the plant, and the engineers were confronted with the problem of connecting this crib in a suitable manner with the condenser intake. After much consideration ‘Acme (Nestable) culvert pipe manufactured by the Canton Culvert Company, Canton, O., was selected for this purpose, as it apparently offered many advantages for this class of work. It is manufactured of special rust resisting metal, is heavily galvanized, is corrugated to give it strength, and is light and easily handled. It was necessary to make up the pipe under water, using divers for this purpose and ease of handling became of great importance. The pipe is 00 inches in diameter and lies in a trench dredged in the bottom of the river, the bottom of the pipe being 10 feet below the natural bed of the stream and runs from the center of the crib to the former intake chamber with one rigiit tingle bend looking up at the shore end. This 60-inch pipe is made up of No. 12 gage corrugated galvanized plates of ‘No-Co-Ro’ metal and is made up in the factory in semi-cylinders with flanged edges. The plates composing the straight run of pipes are joined up by bolting together the projecting side flanges and by bolting the overlapping girth joints which in tile top sheets come half way between those in the bottom sheets, thus breaking joints in every section In putting in this pipe the plates were thus joined together above water to make sections of pipe about 50 feet long which when laid in the trench required only one joint to be made up under water in each length. Before bolting up the sections of pipe, both the longitudinal and girth seams were filled with Slaters cement, an excess amount of cement being used to insure a reasonably tight joint. As the pipe is buried in the river bottom and there is no appreciable pressure it is not necessary to have the joints tighter than is required to prevent the infiltration of sand. After the pipe was laid in the trench the latter was back filled to provide mechanical protection to the pipe and the former intake was converted into a closed chamber to exclude unfiltered river water. Since this installation was completed about January 1 of this year it has been constantly in use without a moment’s interruption and with remarkable results as to volume and quality of water handled and the troubles from condenser maintenance have been entirely overcome.”

Cross Plains, Tex., has just completed a steel reservoir of 60,000 gallons capacity.

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