JERSEY CITY DEPARTMENT.

JERSEY CITY DEPARTMENT.

Last Tuesday was a gala day in Jersey City, and one that will long be remembered by those who witnessed, as well as those who took part in, the grand procession in honor of the Battle of Paulus Hook, which was fought one hundred years ago. The day was ushered in by the ringing of bells, firing of cannons, and blowing of steam whistles, etc., for fifteen minutes after sunrise—which was hailed with delight by “Young America,” as well as old. According to the resolution passed by the Fire Commissioners, the Chief Engineer sent an order, which was posted up in every Engine, and Truck-house, directing the men to get themselves, and apparatus, and horses, in readiness for taking part in the Centennial celebration. The members of the different companies were at work early in the morning, cleaning and brightening up their machines, and seemed delighted with the prospect of having a fine parade, as well as a beautiful day, to show themselves to their fellowcitizens, and also their pa’riotism in helping to celebrate Jersey City’s historic battle. The day was all that could be desired—bright and fair. Soon after dinner, men, women, and children were seen in all directions wending their way toward lower Jersey City, and taking their positions upon the stoops and sidewalks of every street through which the pageant was to pass. About four o’clock the order to maich was given. The procession was divided into seven divisions: The first division was composed entirely of the military of Jersey City, and elsewhere, and made an imposing appearance. The second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth divisions were made up by various civic societies, Posts of the Grand Army, etc. The seventh division comprised the entire Fire Department of Jersey City, and marched as follows: The Board of Fire Commissioners seated in open carriages; band of music; Chief Engineer Doyle, in command, assisted by the District Engineers; then followed the firemen, the permanent men in fatigue caps and dress, and the men-at-call in black pants, blue shirts and fire caps. The men were all massed together, with the former sandwiched between each platoon. After the men had passed, the horses and apparatus—which showed to a better advantage—came along as follows: Engines Nos. One and Two; Truck No. One; Engines Nos. Three and Four; Truck No. Two; Engines Nos. Five, Six, and Seven; Truck No. Three; Engines Nos. Eight and Nine; Truck No. Four; Engines Nos. Ten and Eleven; Truck No. Five; Engine No. Twelve, and Chemical Engine. The different machines, etc., all seemed to be in good order, and were a very attractive feature in the parade. The horses presented a fine appearance, and pranced along as if conscious of the important part they were taking in the grand turnout. If each company could have marched with i s own apparatus, it would have shown the Department off to a much better advantage, and received more praise from the thousands of lookers-on. Following the firemen along, we heard not a few make expressions of disappointment at the mob-like order the men were marched in, and some even suggested that the heads of the Department would do well to go over to New York the next time its Department turned out and take a few lessons, and thus introduce a change on this side of the river. The entire celebration was an honor to the occasion, and the gentlemen who conceived and carried out the programme deserve great credit. All the public buildings were decorated, and also many of the private dwellings and stores all over the city. In the evening, fireworks were displayed in several of the parks, and concerts, picnics, etc., were given by different associations, in honor of the day, and in commemoration of the Battle of Paulus Hook.

JERSEY CITY DEPARTMENT.

JERSEY CITY DEPARTMENT.

The old saying that “it’s a long lane that has no turn “seems figuratively applied to the Jersey City Fire Commissioners, verified at last, and the turning point in their long endeavors to organise reached. Pursuant to adjournment, the Commissioners met on Thursday evening, June 19, and to the surprise of many, succeeded in electing a permanent president of the board. When Clerk Doremus called the roll all the members answered to their names. They immediately commenced voting, and after three ballots were had, resulting In the inevitable tie, Commissioner McDonough moved to take a recess of fifteen minutes, which was carried. The commissioners sat in their seats looking at each other for a few moments, when suddenly they seemed to think that something must be done. They went into caucus, and about an hour after returned with countenances beaming with smiles, indicating that the Rubicon had been passed, and that all was serene. On being called to order, Commissioner McDonough moved that Commissiom-r Ayers be appointed chairman pro tern., which motion was adopted unanimously. Commissioner Ayers, on taking the chair, returned his thanks to the Board for the honor they had conferred upon him. He then stated that the first business in order was the election of a permanent president of the board. Commissioner McDonough then nominated Commissioner O’Donnell, who being the only nominee, the board proceeded to take a ballot. Commissioners Roe and McDonough were appointed tellers. Five votes were cast, and Commissioner O’Donnell, receiving the whole number, was declared elected. Commissioners Leather and McCarthy conducted the newly elected president to the chair, who then returned his thanks for the high honor and for the confidence reposed in him by his brother members. He would, with their assistance, endeavor to perform the duties that would devolve upon him with satisfaction to the board, with credit to Jersey City, and for the best interests of the Department. Commissioner McDonough then moved that the order of business and rules of the old board be adopted for the government of the new until otherwise ordered; carried. There being no further business, and the hour being late, the newly organised board adjourned. President O’Donnell and Commissioners Ayers and McDonough then invited their friends to partake of their hospitality.

President O’Donnell is an old member of the Board, and also an old Fireman, having been connected many years with the old Volunteer Department, during which time he served in many prominent positions connected with it. He Is a business man, and is well liked by all who have the pleasure of his acquaintance ; always modest and unassuming in his deportment, he has a host of friends, who unite in their congratulations and consider him the right man in the right place. Now, that the Board is organised, it is hoped that all facetiousness will be kept out of it, and that all the Commissioners, Democrats as well as Republicans, will turn a deaf ear to outsiders who would like to run the Department in their own interests. The people have elected the Commissioners to attend to the welfare of the Department, and, as they are, one and all, capable men, let them cast aside party opposition, and when they retire fropi the Board they will each receive the praise of, ” Well done, good and faithful servant I”

TUESDAY EVENING, June 24.—The Board met this evening, President O Donnall in the chair. Clerk Doremus called the roll, and all the Commissioners answered to their names. The principal business of the evening was the reduction of salaries in the Department, which will be a saving of over $10,000, and help the city financially. The reductions were as follows: Chief Engineer, $1800; Assistant, $1100; District Engineers, $200; Permanent men, $65° ‘• Engineers. $800; stokers, $750; drivers, $700; men-at-call, $70; Foremen, $150. A percentage was also taken off of all the other employes in the Department, and expenses generally cut down. After the appointment of the several Committees, the Board adjourned. On Thursday, 26th, the Commissioners, accompanied by the Mayor and other prominent officials, will make a tour of the city, for the purpose of inspecting the