JOHNSTOWN WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT

JOHNSTOWN WATER DEPARTMENT REPORT

Superintendent Edgar Hodges of the Johnstown, N. Y., Water Department, in his report for the year ending December 31, 1915, to the Water Commissioners gives the following data for the year: Total extension of mains, 2,081 feet; number of taps added, 24; gate valves added, 14; hydrants added, 4. The Board of Water Commissioners consists of Louis K. Maylender, president; William H. Streeter, Tracy C. Smith, Joseph C. Fonda and Edward Wells. City Clerk Grover E. Yerdon is Clerk of the Hoard. Superintendent Hodges stated in the report that in the spring Cork Center reservoir was drawn off and thoroughly cleaned and side walls repaired and that the Warren Creek, which had been the source of much trouble, caused by dirty water after heavy rains, had been cleaned from Sylvan Falls intake to its source and had improved its condition satisfactorily. The receipts for the year, including balance on hand January 1, 1815, were $47,407.86. Of this sum the water rents collected amounted to $26,558.25. The disbursements amounted to $32,898.58, leaving a balance on hand of $14,509.28. The population of the city is estimated at 12,500 and the city covers an area of 2,000 acres. The Cold Brook reservoir was constructed in 1878 and Warren reservoir was constructed in 1893, while the Cork Center reservoir was constructed in 1895. Svlvan Falls intake was constructed in 1914. The capacity of reservoirs is as follows: Cold Brook, 10,000,000 gallons; Warren, 2,500,000 gallons, and Cork Center, 700,000 gallons. The supply is from springs and the system is gravity. Warren and Cold Brook reservoirs are 3 miles from the city and Cork Center reservoir is 5 miles from the city. Altitudes above tide level are as follows: Warren reservoir, 925 feet; Cold Brook reservoir, 925 feet; Cork Center reservoir, 955 feet; Cold Brook intake, 1,074 feet; Sylvan Falls intake, 1.047 feet. Distributing mains are 4 to 10-inch. The supply, Warren stream, gallons per day, minimum is 106,000; supply, cork Center stream, gallons per day, minimum is 1,887,000; supply, Cold Brook stream, gallons per day, minimum is 350,000; the number of fire hydrants is 210; total number of services is 2,356; total number of services metered, is 254; miles of mains, 38, and number of valves, is 397. Cold Brook and Warren reservoirs are connected with the distributing mains of the city with a 10-inch main; and Cork Center reservoir is connected with the distributing main of the city with a 16-inch main; therefore, the city of Johnstown has two independent sources of supply. Features of the water works system are referred to in the report, as follows: Sylvan Falls intake which was built in 1914 has a capacity of 106,000 gallons per day. Source of supply, Warren Stream. 1,650 feet of 6-inch cast iron pipe connects the pipe from the intake to the 10-inch main below the Warren reservoir. Owing to the Warren reservoir having 30 feet less head than Cork Center reservoir, the purpose of this intake is to deliver the Warren Stream direct to the citv, from an elevation corresponding to Cork Center reservoir. Cold Brook diverting dam: The original dam built in 1878 was located about 100 feet upstream from the present one and was of timber and plank construction. It was found that a large amount of the waters of Cold Brook passed around and under the dam instead of into the conduit to the distribution reservoir. The present dam was built in 1883, and has a foundation in gravel below the creek bed, with a small receiving basin paved with stone laid in cement and it retains and delivers all the waters of Cold Brook, 350,000 gallons per day, to the Cold Brook reservoir through 3,000 feet of 12-inch tile conduit and 1.200 feet of 8-inch cast iron pipe. The brick gate house was built in 1908. The Cold Brook storage reservoir was built in 1878. Capacity 10,000,000 gallons. Sources of supply, Cold Brook 350,000 gallons per day delivered to the reservoir through 3,000 feet of 12-inch tile conduit and 1,200 feet of 8-inch cast iron pipe; Warren Brook 106,000 gallons per day delivered through 515 feet of 12-inch cast iron pipe; this 12-inch pipe runs on a level with VVarren reservoir, and serves as an overflow from the main reservoir to VVarren Brook and reservoir or as a feeder from VVarren Brook to main reservoir. Supply delivered to the city through 12,470 feet of 10-inch cast iron pipe. Water from Cold Brook can also be switched to VVarren reservoir through 600 feet of 6-inch cast iron pipe and the 12-inch pipe above mentioned. F’ive hundred and fifty feet of 8-inch cast iron pipe connects the pipe from Cold Brook to the 10-inch main below the reservoir, with a 10-inch check valve on the main above the connection. The purpose of this by-pass is to deliver the Cold Brook water to the city, as Cold Brook reservoir has 30 feet less head than Cork Center reservoir; the head is automatically balanced in the pipe on the steep grade above the reservoir. The Warren storage reservoir was constructed in 1892-3. The capacity is 2,550,000 gallons. Source of supply is VVarren Brook. 106,000 gallons per day or overflowfrom Cold Brook reservoir, or Cold Brook by means of pipe as explained above. The supply is delivered to main through !)72 feet of ten-inch cast iron pipe, connected to the main below Cold Brook reservoir. In 1903 the catch basin Cork Center reservoir was built. Its purpose is to catch leaves and sediment which are sluiced past the reservoir through a thirty-inch pipe and the open sluiceway already referred to. The sluice gate is also open at any time when the water of the stream is turbid. Temporary supply auxiliary reservoir is also taken through the sluice, serving as a by-pass to the reservoir. Waste weir and by-pass is about 200 feet from the auxiliary reservoir. When the main reservoir is emptied for cleaning a temporary supply is kept up through the sluice or by-pass and auxiliary. Cork Center distributing reservoir was built in 1895. Capacity, 700,000 gallons. Located on Cork Center Creek, flowing 1,887,000 gallons per day minimum. Supply delivered to the city through 5.6 miles of 16-inch cast iron pipe. The white line showing in the rear of the gate house is the concrete sluiceway for sluicing turbid water by the reservoir; 200 feet down stream from the end of sluiceway is located a small auxiliary reservoir, connected to the main below the reservoir, but upstream from the outfall of the 24-inch blowoff pipe, so that the supply can be temporarily taken from the auxiliary, while the main reservoir is being cleaned. This improvement with the concrete sluiceway was built in 1905

Superintendent Edgar Hodges of Johnstown, N. Y.

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