Kalamazoo Department Stops Big Fire

Kalamazoo Department Stops Big Fire

A fire which broke out recently in the building of the Hanselman Candy Co., Kalamazoo, Mich., caused damages of $30,000—$10,000 on the building and $20,000 on the contents, consisting of candies, cigars and machinery. The building, which was built of brick, was three stories, 22 years old, partitioned with brick and equipped with extinguishers. It stood between Lake Shore and the G. R. and I. Railroad, on a street 50 feet wide, in which was a 10-inch water main. The fire, as reported to this journal by Chief C. H. Russell, was of unknown origin. At 4.30 a m. a letter carrier pulled the nearest box. but when the apparatus arrived the flames had broken the windows of the first and second floors and were shooting up to the roof. To fight th s blaze four steamers of the American-La France make were used. There were available two 4-iuch and three 6-inch hydrants, located about 250 fecit apart. The hydrant pressure from the direct pumping system was 80 pounds. Twelve hydrant streams, thrown at one time, was the largest number operated. The size of the nozzles were 1 1/8 and 1 1/4 inch and a 3-way Siamese was also used. About 4,000 feet of cotton rubber fined hose were laid, of which two lengths burst Except that the firemen worked hard to confine the fire to the building in which it originated, they met with little difficulty in their arduous task.

Each fire in Cleveland, O., during 1912. cost the taxpayers $338.37 for attending suburban fires, $325 used to be charged: the rate is now raised to $375 a call. The total number of alarms was 3.060. The total number of actual fires was 2.622. During the year the department ran 17.512 miles; the cost of operation per mile wa s $50.66.

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