Keystone Fire Chiefs Association Meets

Keystone Fire Chiefs Association Meets

One hundred and fifty fire chiefs and guests attended the annual spring meeting of the Keystone Fire Chiefs Association on May 19 in the Swarthmore Women’s Club, as guests of the Swarthmore Fire and Protective Association.

Highlight of the meeting was a talk on fire and sabotage by arson given by Special Agent Francisco of the Philadelphia office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

The meeting was conducted by Chief McInerney, President of the Association. Harry Hamby, Sr., President of the Swarthmore Fire and Protective Association and Dr. John Pitman, Swarthmore Burgess, welcomed the chiefs and guests. Former Captain John Rowe of the Philadelphia Fire Department spoke on “What makes a volunteer.”

Keystone Fire Chiefs’ Association Meets

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Keystone Fire Chiefs’ Association Meets

With one of the largest attendances in its history, the Keystone Fire Chiefs’ Association held its business session and banquet at Reading, Pa., on February 20. The principal purpose of the meeting was to adopt the new by-laws. A reception followed, after which a banquet was given.

Chief John C. Niethammer of the Reading fire department, presented Ex-Chief Francis E. Soule, of Coatsville, president of the association, as toastmaster. After complimenting the hosts, the toastmaster called on Mayor William E. Sharman, who spoke mainly on traffic matters. He pointed out the danger encountered by firemen in getting to fires under the present congested condition of the Reading streets, and said that a remedy must be sought, even though it cost the citizens increased taxation.

Chief Niethammer followed with a few facetious remarks, and Councilman William J. Smith, Superintendent of the Department of Safety, paid a deserved tribute to the volunteer firemen. Charles E. Clark of Wayne, secretary of the State Firemen’s Association, outlined the work of the state body and referred to the granting of workman’s compensation to the volunteers. Seibert L. Whitman, head of the fire prevention bureau in Reading, emphasized the necessity of keeping the streets in the best of condition, in order to protect the life of citizens and to enable the fire departments to make the best time in responding to alarms. He referred to the enlistment of Chief Niethammer in the interest of good roads, and urged him to continue in the good work.

Chief Franklin Gilkeson of Bristol, submitted a draft of the revised by-laws, which, after making a few changes, were adopted. Among the new provisions is the election of three trustees, and the following were chosen: Howard Frey of Collingsdale; Charles E. Clark of Wayne; William L. Stackhouse of Hulmerville. Four classes of membership were created —active, active life, honorary life, and beneficial. Instead of one fund, three were provided—current, endowment and death benefit of $100. Another amendment calls for five standing committees— membership, fire prevention, legislation, drills and training, and education.

St. Joseph, Mich., Wants Apparatus—St. Joseph, Mich., is reported to be in the market for fire apparatus, having appropriated about $12,000 for the purpose.