LAYING A VITRIFIED CLAY PIPE.

LAYING A VITRIFIED CLAY PIPE.

Early in the season of 1900 the board of water commissioners, Hartford, Conn., decided to put in a conduit to carry the water in the canal between the reservoirs. This canal was an open one, and on account of leakage had become unreliable. It was considered necessary to bring the water in a conduit of large size, and after careful consideration of the class of pipe to be used vitrified clay was agreed upno. The contract was awarded the American Sewer Pipe company, of Pittsburg, Pa., for 16,000 feet of extra heavy vitrified clay pipe of twentyfour-inch diameter and three feet lengths. The illustrations show the pipe laid and a double curve, the sockets in the foreground ready for cement, and the line completed in the background. The other view shows the pipe in a ditch in a cut made through trap rock, with a cloth covering over the joints to prevent the cement setting too rapidly. The average pressure on the conduit is six pounds. After three years’ service the commissioners say the line is very satisfactory, as no leaks have occurred, and the conduit delivers more water than it was calculated to carry at the time it was planned. For conveying water under similar conditions as that stated above vitrified pipe may be relied upon, provided the necessary care is exercised in laying. In a number of places clay pipe has been used for waterworks conduits, and the engineers in charge have reported it met the requirements in each case.

SHOWING DOUBLE CURVE; SOCKETS IN FOREGROUND READY FOR CEMENT; LINE COMPLETED IN BACKGROUND.THROUGH TRAP ROCK CUT; CLOTH OVER PIPE TO PREVENT CEMENT SETTING TOO RAPIDLY.

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