LEAD AND TIN-LINED IRON PIPE

LEAD AND TIN-LINED IRON PIPE

Visit of Waterworks Men to the Home of the Industry.

Not many years ago lead and tin-lined iron pipe for services was unknown in waterworks distribution practice. Now it has grown so popular that it is included in the estimates for supplies of a large number of plants in all parts of the country. This is owing to its adaptability for this special purpose. Lead, galvanised iron, cement-lined, wrought and cast iron and other kinds of service pipes have been in use ever since taps in water mains were made; but these are gradually giving way to the iron lead and tin-lined material, which, so far as can be learned, is proving the most satisfactory pipe obtainable for house services. The construction of the pipe has been greatly improved since it was first introduced, the lead-lining being inserted and forced into position under a hydraulic pressure of over 1,000 pounds to the square inch, or melted on the iron hot. These processes supersede the old style of lining, which was by passing a rod through the pipe, which pressed the lead against the iron interior coating, but was likely to leave some slight imperfection, which could not be discovered until the pipe was used. By the hydraulic or melting processes all interstices are closed up, and a smooth and perfect face is produced on the lead lining. The Lead-Lined Iron Pipe company, manufacturers of this pipe, has a well equipped plant at Wakefield. Mass. It is the original concern that started the lead and tin-lined iron pipe industry, and that firm is the only one that has any claim upon the waterworks people, as it was through the persistent efforts of its present manager, Thomas E. Dwyer, that these special brands of pipe have been kept in the market. Below are given sectional views of the pipe and fittings, showing the application of lead lining. The pipe is wrought iron, and the lead or tin is inserted and forced into position by hydraulic pressure or melting process, as stated above, forming a complete lining, which adheres to the outside pipe, as if it were a part of itself. The pipe may be cut and bent without interfering with its stability or displacing the lining. It is admirably adapted for water service, as it is hygienic, and, owing to its construction, it can be handled with as much facility as any of the older styles of pipe. A large and representative number of the members of the New England Waterworks association inspected the plant at Wakefield on the 9th inst,, in response to the following notice: “Through the courtesy of Thomas E. Dwyer, manager of the Lead-Lined Iron Pipe company, the members of the association will be afforded an opportunity to visit the works and to witness the manufacture of lead-lined iron pipe, on Wednesday. March 9. The party, under the escort of F. E. Merrill, will leave North Union station, Boston, for Wakefield, returning in season for the afternoon session of the association.” The visitors looked over the works, and were much pleased with the methods employed in the manufacture of the pipe. Thomas E. Dwyer received the party, and explained the details of the work. He afterwards had a group photograph taken, which is reproduced here. It was explained that only eleven-foot lengths of the pipe were made by the old process of lining with the rod, but that now lengths of sixteen feet can be turned out as rapidly—an increase which effects an important change. The company makes pipes of all sizes up to eighteen inches, those of the larger diameter being used principally for mining operations. The plant is capable of manufacturing over 5,000 feet of this pipe every day, and large quantities of it are used in the principal waterworks of the country, such as Baltimore, Md., Columbus, Ohio, Lynn, Lowell, and Lawrence, Mass., Atlantic City and Paterson, N. J., New York city, and Manchester, N. H., where from 100,000 to 300,000 feet are in use.

SECTION OF LEAD-LINED IRON PIPE.SECTION OF LEAD LINED IRON PIPE.

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