Lewis I. Birdsall on Use of Chlorine

Lewis I. Birdsall on Use of Chlorine

At the recent convention of the Minnesota Section, American Water Works Association, Lewis I. Birdsall, superintendent of purification, Minneapolis, spoke extemporaneously on the subject, “The Use of Chlorine for the Sterilization of Water Supplies and Its Effect Upon Their Potability.” In discussing the subject Mr. Birdsall spoke briefly of the use of hypochlorite of lime as a sterilizing agent at Boonton, New Jersey, and at the stockyards in Chicago in 1909 and 1910; of the disadvantages of hypochlorite of lime as a sterilizing agent, the advent of liquid chlorine and chlorine machines, the use of chlorine for water purification by armies during the war, the general adoption of chlorine as a means of water purification in the United States at the present time, the advantages of liquid chlorine over hypochlorite of lime as a sterilizing agent, the necessity of competent supervision and careful laboratory control in the operation of chlorine sterilization plants, the necessity for duplicate installations of chlorine machines and the keeping on hand of extra parts for the machines; the relation of the chlorine absorption capacity of a given water to the mineral and organic content of the water and the production of residual tastes and odors. Dr. Laird of the St. Louis County Tuberculosis Sanitarium at Nopeming, Minn., also spoke referring to some experimental work that he is carrying out in connection with the sterilization of the hospital sewage with chlorine.

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