Little Rock Fire Report

Little Rock Fire Report

The report for the year 1914 of Chief C. S. Hafer, of the Little Rock, Ark., fire department, states that there were 471 alarms, that the loss was $249,092.67 in property valued at $1,079,260.80 and insured for $991,816. The loss on buildings was 131,161.40 and on contents, $118,501.27. Four deaths resulted from fire. Causes of 121 fires are unknown. Mice and matches caused three, children and matches three, overturned lamps three and lamp explosions two; burning grass, 42; burning chimneys, 22, and false alarms 38. Sparks from chimneys started 19 fires, burning trash, 13. Four fires were responsible for nearly half the loss by the conflagration of June 6, which destroyed and damaged 24 buildings, mostly frame, with a loss of $16,335.73. The Falk Millinery Company’s store, January 22, loss $23,682.67. Auto Garage, April 10, .with a loss of $16,950. The heaviest single loss was the Reinman & Woolfort fire, November 18, destroying a stable with a loss of $44,795. Hours of service, 361; miles traveled, 1,272; hose used, 145,925 feet; ladders, 4,222 feet, and 2,502 gallons of chemical. Fires confined to the place of origin, 394; confined to the floor, 322; spread to adjoining buildings, 18, and extended beyond adjoining buildings, 5. The cost of department maintenance was $83,592.32.

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Little Rock Fire Report

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Little Rock Fire Report

Fire protection cost Little Rock, Ark., $154,766.39, including recently purchased apparatus, during the past two years, according to the official report of Fire Chief Hafer, made to Mayor Charles E. Taylor a few days ago. In that same period, fire protection saved Little Rock people just about $600,000. The fire loss on buildings and contents in Little Rock in the year 1911 aggregated $810,195.19. In 1912 the losses amounted to only $225,496.16. So far this year—for the three months making the first quarter—the losses have amounted to $85,363.15. Of the total of 39 calls. 45 were false alarms, leaving 352 fires of more or less importance. And more than 12 per cent, of these were the result of human activity, known or believed, with actually one out of every 11 brought about “for cause,” as the lawyers would phrase it, according to the chief. New fire hydrants to the number of 106 have been ordered installed, which will add $5,300 per year to the water bill of the city. Value of buildings and their contents, in which fires occurred the past two and a fraction ears, is given as follows:

The chief points out that there are only 39 tire alarm boxes in the department’s system, and necessarily many telephone calls are received. The chief deplores the tact that there is such a large territory without the protection ot the alarm service, and urges and recommends that additional boxes be installed, particularly because such a small proportion of the people generally know where the lire boxes are located.