Little Rock Has Million Dollar Fire.

Little Rock Has Million Dollar Fire.

A fire involving the destruction of $1,000,000 worth of property swept over the heart of the business district of Little Rock, Ark. on January 8. From the best information obtainable, the fire started in the fifth story of the building owned by Governor Donaghey, on Seventh and Main streets, occupied by the Hollenberg Music Company, and spread through the Jackson-Hanley Furniture Company’s place to the store of the Jones House Furnishing Company and into the buildings between the Jones store and Sixth street, owned by the Shall estate and occupied by the J. H. Martin Arms Company, E. D. Bracy’s hardware store, Askin & Marine and Lloyd’s Sporting Goods House on the corner of Sixth and Main streets. Gov. George W. Donaghey is the heaviest individual loser. Two building owned by the governor, valued at more than $100,000, were destroyed, only partially covered by insurance. When discovered at .9 o’clock a. m., flames were shooting from the windows. The flames spread rapidly against a strong wind from the north. The firemen were greatly hindered by frozen water plugs and inadequate water pressure. In the middle of the block was a strong fire wall and the adjoining building was protected bv a sprinkler system. Here the firemen made a desperate stand, attempting to save the rest of the block. For four hours the struggle lasted, and then the fire wall crumbled before the terrific heat and the fire swept through the remainder of the block. The burning of the two ammunition stores was accompanied bv the explosion of thousands of shells. Hundreds of Roman candles and skyrockets were ignited and went soaring skyward, seriously endangering adjacent buildings. Owners of practically all the burned buildings have announced their intention of rebuilding.

Members of the congregation of the Bloomingrave, N. Y., Dutch Reformed Church had to stand idle and see the historic edifice entirely destroyed, causing a loss of $15,000, on Sunday. January 1. There was no water protection nor apparatus, and word was sent to Rensselaer for two wagons. The trip, however, was not made. Bucket brigades saved the sheds and houses.

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