LONG SERVICE OF JOHN CAULFIELD.

LONG SERVICE OF JOHN CAULFIELD.

John Caulfield, St. Paul, Minn.

A St Paul paper has a friendly sketch of John Caulfield since he became connected with the water board of that city. It says, in part: “Thirty-seven years ago last Thursday John Caulfield entered the employ of the St. Paul Water company, and four years later was elected secretary. This position he has retained through the transfer of the property to the city, and through successive changes in the city administration. He was made secretary of the water company when he was twenty years old, and has made the water system of St. Paul his life-long study, lie knows everv water main in the city, and is so well acquainted with its streets as to be able to tell at a glance of the map where the connections from the main to a certain house should be made. He entered the employ of the old company on October 10, 1870, and in 1874 was elected secretary. The company then had only two or three miles of pipe.. In 1882 the city took over the property of the company, and Mr. Caulfield W’as continued as secretary. Up to 1889 the district judges appointed the members of the water board. Through all the changes the same man has presided at the desk of the secretary, meeting objectors to the board’s rules with a firm front, and pacifying those who through accident have had their water shut off. No city officer has conducted its w’ork with more thoroughness and satisfaction to the board and to the public generally than John Caulfield. ‘1 well remember the election day when it was decided that the city should take over the water plant,’ said Mr. Caulfield. C. D. Gilfillan—that is his picture upon the wall—was president of the company, had practically built it up. He was in the State senate at the time, and was not unwilling to sell; but he said that the transfer would have to be made under a law he would draw He didn’t want the water plant to fall into the hands of politicians, and the law finally adopted was the one which he drew up. His was the law really passed, and is the one the water department operates under today, except for the change in the person who appoints the water board. He made it very clear that every one was to be treated alike in the management. There are no deadheads, nor are there any special rates for favored persons. It was Mr. Gilfillan’s desire that all favoritism and chance for political spoil be eliminated, and he was rather successful. The city voted to pay $500,000 for the plant. Men told Mr. Gilfillan that he ought to get a million or more, but he said that he was satisfied. Certainly the city got a bargain.”

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