Los Angeles Fire.

Los Angeles Fire.

CHIEF WALTER LIPS, COS ANGELES, CAL.

“When the Zellerbach Paper company’s wholesale warehouse was destroyed the other day by fire, there was very little to show on the outside, “so little, indeed,” writes our correspondent, “that it was not worth while to take any photograph of the burning, since, unless one had been taken from the roof of the adjoining building, all that could have been seen was the damaged window frames. The good work of the department under Chief Walter Lips held the flames to the place of origin and saved a much greater loss than was at first anticipated. The valuable services of the fire department were so thoroughly appreciated that the owner of the building sent $250 as a donation to the Firemen’s Relief Fund, and the Zellerbach company, $150. As it was. the loss was $107,000, with an insurance of 70 per cent. It need not be remarked that the gravity water system of the city easily proved equal to the emergency, kept the engines well supplied with water. The fire was in a very dangerous portion of the city, right in its congested wholesale district. The building itself was of solid brick mill construction all through its three floors and had been erected for not more than seven years. It was not sprinklered, however, and occupied a space of 60×120 ft. in a street whose width in front of the warehouse was 80 ft. On it was laid a 12-in. main, and on it were set six double 4-in. and double 2-in. hydrants at distances of 200 ft. from each other, the pressure on these hydrants was 65 lb. No hydrant, only engine streams were thrown— fifteen at one time from nine engines, in addition to which were two hook and ladder trucks, 2 hose companies and a water tower. No less than 7,000 ft. of cotton, rubber-lined hose were laid, the nozzles being 1‘6-in. to 2-in. The length of hose kept sound to the very end: not one burst. The cause of the fire is unknown; but it was an ugly blaze while it lasted. It started on the third floor, and. when the department arrived, the whole of that portion was well alight, and the flames were coming through all the windows both in front and rear. The firemen, however, drowned them out, and did not let them go any further, either up or down. The paper stock was, of course, very inflammable, and that the flames did not spread all over the building and communicate with adjacent structures was due to the plentiful supply of water and the energetic efforts of the firemen.”

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