Los Angeles Grain Fire Confined to Building of Origin

Los Angeles Grain Fire Confined to Building of Origin

The industrial section of Los Angeles, Cal., recently was visited by a fire that destroyed the Globe Grain and Milling Company’s plant, occupying an entire city block of 300 x 450 feet. The building was of brick construction, four stories in front and two in the rear, and was about ten years old. The partition walls were also of brick, and hose on 1 1/2-inch standpipes were installed for protection, but in this instance proved to be quite the reverse, as the effort of the watchman, on discovering the fire, to extinguish it without outside help, gave opportunity for it to gain great headway. The fire started in the basement from an overheated shaft bearing, at 4:10 a. m., and the alarm was not pulled until 4 :23. When the department arrived, under command of Chief Archie I. Eley, the structure was already involved from basement to roof, and the chief immediately pulled a second alarm. Thirteen engines, four trucks, three hose wagons, one water tower and one flying squad wagon were employed, with turret nozzles, cellar nozzles and smoke helmets, all of which proved their usefulness. Hydrants available were 16 in number, some 4-inch and others 2p2-inch double and single, approximately 300 feet apart. The street mains were 8-, 10-, 12and 30-inch in dimension. No hydrant streams were thrown, but 25 engine streams were used from 1 1/8-inch nozzles at one time and 14,000 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose were laid. The contents of the plant, being hay and grain, were of so inflammable a nature that the skill and energy of the department could only prevent the fire from spreading beyond the place of origin and it had completely gutted the main building when stopped after burning three hours. The loss on the buildings was $25,000, and on the contents, valued at $125,000, the loss was estimated at $50,000.

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