Los Angeles Water Works a Revenue Producer

Los Angeles Water Works a Revenue Producer

The districts outlined in Chief Engineer Mulholland’s report on the methods by which the aqueduct water is to be brought to Los Angeles, and the surplus water distributed to other municipalities and for irrigation, are already beginning to bestir themselves. Alhambra has ordered an appraisement of us present private water system, ana City Engineer Downer is at work on it, the purpose being to use the system in connection with aqueduct water. The Pasadena Hoard of Trade expects to get the aqueduct water into that city, and this is to be the main problem to be settled. Alhambra and Pasadena were only referred to in the Mulholland report, for he said in that document: “Surveys have been made and complete data collected for the building of a line to both Pasadena and the San Gabriel country by this department, but the cost of such lines seemed to be too excessive to be undertaken by the city of Los Angeles.” Pasadena’s engineering department has made an elaborate survey of a route by which to get the water, and it is possible that Alhambra will seek to join with this project. If this should be done, these two may be among the very earliest of outside districts to become customers of Los Angeles. 1 hey will construct their own mains. All districts outside of the city, if served, must build their own pipe lines, besides paying for the water. The revenue derived by the city of Los Angeles from the sale of this surplus water will be enormous and in a comparatively few years, with the sale of power, will pay for the aqueduct. The sale of water not needed by the city will be of tremendous benefit to the taxpayers of Los Angeles, who, by means of it, will make an immediate and handsome profit on their Owens river investment. In mapping out the districts, the chief engineer has hail in view the best and most economic use of the water. The city has made no promises to any district and is under no obligation to furnish water to any acreage whatever, outside its own territory, and, in fact, the districts are still merely convenient subdivisions on a map. Hut, as soon as it is definitely known what these subdivisions propose to do, there will be no delay. They will have to organize as districts, but, when they shall have organized it will be an easy step for the city to apply for a franchise and get the rights of way necessary for the pipe lines to supply those districts. The board of public service is prepared with maps and with offers of rights of way for every step. These districts are to get such water from the aqueduct as the city shall not require for its own uses. That is a fact impressed upon the public and upon the city council in the Mulholland report. If all the districts for which plans are provided in the report shall take the water, 12,573 miner’s inches will be needed. Of this flow, 2,000 inches must come to Los Angeles. The remainder, 10,573 inches, is the surplus that Los Angeles has for sale to other communities and agricultural and horticultural districts. The aqueduct itself is constructed of a capacity of 20,000 miner’s inches, as are the permanent structures of concrete, the tunnels and the reservoirs being planned wdth an eye to twenty years hence, but the mains and the trunk lines tire designed for only about half that quantity of water. This will be sufficient, it is estimated, for some years to come and the lines can easily be duplicated. The engineering department of the aqueduct has adopted a classification of conduits, trunk lines and mains that is purely conventional, but which must he understood to make the maps and plans plain. A conduit, under this classification, is of concrete construction, and is closed. Conduits are planned to convey water between reservoirs, for example. Trunk lines are to be constructed of sheet-steel pipe, riveted, the steel a quarter of an inch thick. A main is smaller, and will be constructed of sheet steel, generally, but will not have to carry the volume that a trunk line will be constructed for. The mains will run into districts at a certain distance apart and from these the laterals will run to localities to be irrigated. There will be none of the great sheet-steel piping anywhere that was required on the aqueduct in the construction of the siphons, however, and the resources of foundries and manufacturers in Los Angeles will be ample to enable them to compete for the business of supplying the pipes for the distributing projects. The water department of Los Angeles has been installing large pipes within the city for the last four years, so the city distributing system ran be tied up to the aqueduct trunk line without delay, and the 36-inch and 30-inch pipes on Vermont avenue and 24-inch on Sixteenth street give an idea of the general character of piping to be used in connection with the aqueduct trunks and mains in all districts. The southwestern part of the city is well considered in the aqueduct plans.

The report of Chief Engineer Mulholland to the board of public service, which was approved by that body and has been supplemented by a map, indicating the districts included in the 195,000-acre terrain to be served ultimately by the water, and a table has been added in which the chief engineer has sought to give at a glance a view of all the projects, with their cost by the miner’s inch and by the acre, and the total cost of construction. The recapitulation in the new table now added to the report shows every one of the projects, with every sub-project and all the subdivisions. Assuming that all the districts should use all the water for which plans have been made, the total cost of the projects would be $3,401,170. The surplus water from the aqueduct would irrigate a total of 158,590 acres at an average cost to the acre of $18.40. The grand total of the cost of engineering and construction for the districts that will use the 10,573 miner’s inches surplus water from the aqueduct is estimated at $2,918.875. It is planned to pay for the main trunk line to supply this city without any assistance from the citizens, as the public service department will have sufficient money to accomplish this. Including an allowance of 10 per cent, for engineering, this trunk will cost, it is estimated, $482,295.

SHOWING CONDITION OF HOSE WHEN NIPPLE BLEW OFF HYDRANT AT WATERBURY FIRE.SCENE DURING PROGRESS OF LEWIS BUILDING FIRE, WATERBURY.

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