Louisville Fire Notes.

Louisville Fire Notes.

(From Our Regular Correspondent.)

Fifteen alarms were sounded within the past week, but no fires of any consequences. $3000 will cover the loss.

While making the run to box 153 Monday morning the horse on No. 3 reel, slipped and fell to the ground, throwing all of the boys off, Chas. White, the driver, was badly bruised, so that he will have to lay off duty for some time.

Monday seemed to be a day of accidents. Alfred Johnson was seriously burnt about the head and arms at a fire on Preston street, caused by an explosion of paint that was cooking on a stove. Ed. Cline of No. 2 hook and ladder con pany received a bad cut while removing the tin roofing on a stable fire. George Barth broke his leg while trying to remove a wagon from the same stable fire.

Chas. Mercker, son of Chief Mercker, of the New Albany Department, is the inventor of something new in the line of fire fighting apparatus. It is a combination of the aerial truck and the water tower. Mr. Mercker has a perfect working model in his father’s office and has filed papers for a patent. Though young in years Mr. Mercker is an expert mechanic, and many of the improvements adopted by the New Albany Department are due to him. At present he is the chief electrician for the department.

Plans for the two new engine houses are completed and in a short while the members of the No. 3 and No. 4 engine companies will be in new quarters. Preston Lodge of Masons will occupy the third floor of the new No. 3 engine house, and will stand their portion of the costs for building.

No name is better known throughout this section than that of Major Edw-ard Hughes, chief of the fire department, and his generous, frank and open-hearted disposition has made him many friends. His entire life, it might be said, has been spent in the department. In the dajs of the volunteer service he was one of the most active members. Physically the Major is a better man than he was ten years ago. Though somewhere in the neighborhood of fifty-six years of age, his looks and activity are that of a man of forty. No chief in the country is held in higher esteem and is more popular with his subordinates. The present standard of the department is entirely due to him. Upon his election in 1879 the department was in a dilapidated condition and from that day a change was noticeable.

Louisville Fire Notes.

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Louisville Fire Notes.

(From Our Regular Correspondent.)

Twenty-eight alarms were sounded within the past two weeks from the city boxes and four from the automatic. No fires of any amount, and $8000 will cover the entire loss. While responding to an alarm from box 47 last Monday night the members of No. 2 Hook and Ladder Company had a very close call from death. Four received painful injuries As the truck turned the corner it collided with an electric car. The motorman saw the truck coming and put on his brakes, but the track being wet and slippery the car ran into the truck, breaking the fender lanterns and knocking Capt. Val Riehl, Henry Martin, Sam Stokes and another member into the street. All were badly bruised, Sam Stokes having his back sprained. Capt. Dan Addis, second assistant chief, was sitting on the side where the collision occurred and was fastened beneath the top of the truck and the roof of the car. Had he been in his usual position on the truck he would have in all probabilities been killed. The force with which the electric car collided with the truck shoved the latter, which weighs nearly 8000 pounds, a distance of fifteen feet sideways. Dr. Griffiths attended the men, and all, with the exception of Stokes, are again on duty. This last accident makes the sixth time that Capt. Kiehl was knocked from the truck headforemost.

Among the members who spend their leisure time in working up some new improvement that would be of benefit to the department, Capt. Val Richl of No. 2 Truck has been most successful. Many of the improvements in the above house are due to him. His latest invention is a little device attached to the ends of a Bangor ladder. When a ladder has to be raised to any height, and should rest on an incline ground, by means of a ratchet plate which is placed on either side of the ladder it can be made to stand perfectly level.

An alarm from the private box in the prison South in Jeffersonville called the department of that city Thursday morning to a very disastrous fire within the prison walls. The fire originated in the drying room of the Clagett Saddle Tree Company, which company works about 150 convicts. The building in which the fire started was a two story brick, 150 feet long by 50 feet wide, w ith a 6o-foot wing. The lower floors were used for the manufacturing of saddle tices, the upper for store rooms. The convicts attempted to put the hre out, but it made such progress that the outside department was called. Upon their arrival the entire building was one mass of flames. On account of the poor supply of water and the time it took to lock the convicts in one of the cell houses, the tire had spread to the adjoining buildings, and for a time it seemed as if the entire prison was doomed. Engines Nos. 5 and 7 were sent over from this city and greatly helped in extinguishing the tire. The tailor shop, kitchen and new dining hall with a seating capacity of 800 were also destroyed. At the time of the fire there were between 700 and 725 convicts within the walls. All were locked in their cells or placed under guard before the gates admitting the fire department were opened. The loss will amount to $80,000. Clagett & Co. carried on their stock $20,000 insurance. The buildings were insured by the State for $20,000.

Messrs. Kirker & Bender are now in correspondence with the managers of the World’s Fair in regard to exhibiting their fire escape. They propose to erect one of their escapes in the centre of the elevator exhibit. Those making a trip in the elevator can have the novel experience ol making a trip down in the escape.

Captain Ben Bache is again at his post after a three weeks’ sick spell. His many friends are glad to see hitn out.

LOUISVIU.E, KY„ March 27.