Lumber Fire at Burlington, Vt.

Lumber Fire at Burlington, Vt.

It took the whole fire department of Burlington, Vt., consisting of 25 paid firemen, including Chief Engineer C. A. Niles and his assistant chief, besides fifteen call men from the city’s fire stations, with their equipment, comprising an Amoskeag engine, three hose wagons, an American-La France auto truck, a combination auto truck, and a Seagrave city-size ladder truck and 11,000 feet of Eureka cotton, rubber-lined double-jacket hose, besides a steamer borrowed from the village of Winoski, to fight a fierce fire in the lumber mill and yard of the Shepard & Morse Lumber Co., situated in the western part of the city, a most congested section. The building, which was 13 years old. was one story and one-half high and was of wood with a tin roof, with wooden walls and no partitions internally. It was supplied with private fire protective appliances and a sprinkler equipment, but no special means of saving the lives of its 125 employes were provided. The fire, which was discovered by one of the employes at 7.50 a. m., started in the center of the mill and was caused by a spark flying from a machine into a dust-fan spout. A box alarm was at once turned in, which brought the fire department, firemen, and equipment already mentioned. The entire mill was afire and was finally stopped only at the lumberyard. The two engines took suction from the lake and there were eight hydrants available, all 6-inch, two 6-inch double and two 4-way, distant 250 feet from each other and each with a pressure of 100 pounds. Four engine streams were thrown and 17 hydrant—the largest number thrown at one time being 21, and the nozzles used being 1 1/2-inch of the eleven thousand feet of hose laid. Only two 50-foot lengths burst. The width of the street in front of the burned property was 60 feet and the main of the direct-pumping system laid on it was 16-inch and furnished plenty of water all the time for the hydrant streams. The firemen met with no hindrances to their work; used 600,000 gallons of water, and saved the engine house and much of the lumber in the yard. There were destroyed the mill, the dry house, a shed and a number of piles of lumber. The value of the burned property was $75,000; of the contents, $250,000. The loss on buildings was $1.0,000; on contents, $65,000. Several firemen were hurt during the 23 hours they were in service, but none seriously. The. 000,000 gallons of water pumped did not include that pumped from the lake by the engines. That was not measured.

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