Lumber Plant at Kinston Burns

Lumber Plant at Kinston Burns

After finding the lumber kilns at the Kinston, (N. C.) Manufacturing Company all ablaze, the firemen worked so well that in an hour’s time everything not ablaze at the outset was saved. This good piece of work was effected by Chief T. V. Mosely and the forty-eight firemen who were called at 4.30 p. m. to the southwest suburb by the alarm given by a mill employee. The mill whistle also blew an alarm. They found the one-story wood and brick building, which covers six acres’ space, on fire in the lumber kilns. Two hose wagons and a hook and ladder true were the only apparatus available. With good pressure of 100 pounds at the hydrants, effective streams were secured through 2,000 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose that had to be laid. Three 6-inch double hydrants of the city water works system were used. The supply came from the standpipe, which was furnished by direct pumping through a 6-inch street main. Four hydrants at the mill were also available, so that ten good streams were thrown from 2 5/8-inch nozzles. The walls were brick, and there were no partitions, but the dry kilns were separated by brick walls from other parts of the plant. The effectiveness of the department’s work is shown by the small loss of $45,000 on the plant valued at $250,000. Overheated conditions in kilns is given as cause of fire.

Frederick W. Cole, inventor of devices used in fire alarm systems throughout the country, died at his home in Newton, Mass.

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