Lynn Conflagration Anniversary

Lynn Conflagration Anniversary

Twenty-five years ago, November 26, 1889, the Lynn, Mass., conflagration, the largest in the history of Lynn, took place. It started at noon and was caused by the explosion of an oil stove in a glove factory on Almont street, and swept over 25 acres in the heart of the city, destroying 332 buildings; 129 of them dwellings, 158 wooden factories, 32 brick business buildings, etc., 8 stables and one church with a total loss of nearly $5,000,000. Seven thousand people were thrown out of employment. Two days later the great Thanksgiving Day conflagration at Boston took place. Sixty surviving members of the Lynn fire department at that time, which is seventy-five per cent, of its then entire membership, observed its anniversary with a reunion and dinner at Hotel Seymour, November 24 (the real anniversary coming on Thanksgiving Day), under the auspices of the recently organized Box 41 Association, composed of the surviving members of the department at that time. The alarm for the conflagration was sene in from Box 41. The only guest and the only speaker was Asa T. Newhall, who was mayor at that time. Captain C. A. Harradan, president of the Box 41 Association presided. The other officers of the association are B. F. Moody, a son of Abram C. Moody, who was chief of the department at time of the conflagration, secretary; and Chief Engineer E. E. Chase, treasurer. The oldest veteran present was 80 years of age and the youngest a little over half that age. The oldest in years of service present and who is still in the department, was Deputy Chief John Ray, who has been a member of the department fifty-one years.

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