Makes Great Claims for a Fireproof Paint.

Makes Great Claims for a Fireproof Paint.

Rufus W. Lamprey, a carriage painter of Manchester, N. H., claims to have invented a fireproof paint, absolutely bona fide in its ability to withstand heat. If the following tests are described accurately he has discovered a remarkable thing :

He says he can paint the floor, ceiling and walls of a room, fill the room half full of shavings, add five gallons of kerosene, and when this is set on fire it will burn out, leaving no impression on the paint save a smut. During the ten years’time he has devoted to the paint, he claims to have made other and equally surprising tests. He says he has painted two boards, and then stood one upon its edge on top of the second. In the angle he built a fire of leather gimpings, one of the hottest kinds of fire. He fed it for hours and asserted that it had no deleterious effect whatever on the paint or the board. Then he took a piece of wood, soaked it in alcohol, and, after allowing it to dry. gave it a coat of fireproof paint. He then heaped up hot coals upon the board, and as fast as one heap of coals would go out replaced it with another white-heat mass. He says the board remained in a perfectly sound condition. To make the tests more binding, he took another piece of board, painted it. and subjected it to a four hours’ test over a pas jet, then four hours more over an alcohol lamp flame, and then, to crown the test, subjected one spot on the board to the flame of a compound blow pipe for a half hour, which, of course, gave the most intense heat. The result, he affirms, had no more effect on the board than so much water.

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