Manistee’s Fire Loss Small

Manistee’s Fire Loss Small

Chief Scott, of Manistee, Mich., reports that during the year ending March 17, 1813, the fire department of that city responded to 92 alarms. The value of the property affected was $141,650; amount of insurance, at loss, $100,325; loss on buildings, $150.11; on contents, $5,373.73—total loss, $11,122.82, as against an aggregate loss of $46,305.94 in the year before. The 111 buildings inspected included schools, theaters and those of a miscellaneous character. Seventy-eight were found in good condition and in 33 cases changes were recommended. Of the 92 alarms seven were false; of the 85 actual fires, six were of unknown origin; 35 were chimney, 35 were caused by careless smokers, gasoline cleaners, carelessness with respect to matches, gasoline, lighting and heating arrangements, hot ashes and the like; two arose from spontaneous combustion, one apiece from defective wiring and the flames spreading to another building, etc. Chief Scott writes that the water pressure is inadequate and causes extra expense in the way of sending out more apparatus than is necessary. He recommends the resumption of direct pressure during fires and the addition of another hydrant to those already set, of which there are 194, or the laying of an additional pipe line to those already laid from the river for the use of the steamers. He would supersede by new apparatus such pieces as have outlived their usefulness. A 65-foot aerial truck and at least one piece of motor apparatus should be bought.

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