MANSFIELD FIRE ENGINES.

MANSFIELD FIRE ENGINES.

The seven steam fire engines built by the Mansfield, Ohio, Machine works for the city of Cleveland, of which five of the second-class are in commission, and two of the third-class are nearly completed, are thus briefly described. Their general make-up is compact; the centre of gravity is low down; and the dimensions over all are smaller. The front trucks are of the Selle Gear type. The brakes are operated from either front or rear, and, being of an eccentric type, they are powerful. The relief-valves used on these engines are Larkin’s patent, there being one on each side just inside the gates. The gates are of the double-disk, double-seat type, and open with four turns. The tie bars across the arch are very quickly removed and are used only in icy weather. The boiler is of the straight submerged flue type, the fines being thickened at each end where expanded into the flue heads. The shell and firebox are flanged out at the bottom to admit of larger grate area. The steam cylinders are seven and three-quarter-inch diameter the watercylinders.fourand three-eight-inch diameter, and the stroke eight inches. It will he seen from the accompanying cut that the engines are of a new type, being a side crank. The piston rods are carried straight through from cylinder to cylinder, thus transmitting the strain direct, with less mechanism and less weight of reciprocating parts. A small cross-head on the rod takes the strain caused by the angularity of the connecting rods which is usually carried on the stuffing-boxes. The steam pistons are stamped out of steel plate and turned up, thns admitting of a very light piston. The flywheel is placed in the centre and counterbalanced. The shaft is hollow, and, in case of a bearing heating, a stream of water can be turned through it All the official tests have shown favorable results. No attempt was made in these tests to show quick steam. In each case the engines were fired with twenty inches of water above the crown sheet, and the engine was not started until it was ready to do continuous, effective fire duty. This was accomplished in seven minutes. In shop tests, with less water, these engines have been started under five minutes from cold water. The results of the tests of all five engines delivered are about the same. The official report of the fifth engine is as follows,— namely: First test.—One line 150 feet two and onehalf-inch hose, one and oue-eighth-inch nozzle, steam, 135 pounds, distance, 255 feet. Second test.—Two lines of 150 feet each two and one-half-inch hose, two one and one-eighth-inch nozzles, steam, 135 pounds, water, 200 pounds, distance, 240 feet. Third test.— One line 150 feet two and one-half-inch hose, one and one-quarter-inch nozzle, steam, 130 pounds, water, 265 pounds, distance, 275 feet. Fourth test_Two lines 100 feet each two and one-half-inch hose, siamesed to fifty feet, one and one-half-inch nozzle, steam, 130 pounds. water, 240 pounds, distance, 263 feet. Fifth test.— Same lines as test No. 4 siamesed, one and threequarter-inch nozzle, steam, 130 pounds, water, 210 pounds, distance, 250 feet The weight of the second size engine, complete, ready for service, without water or coal, is 6,700 pouuds.

WORKING PARTS OF MANSFIELD STEAM FIRE ENGINES.

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