Many Alarms at Boise.

Many Alarms at Boise.

During the year 1908 the Boise, Idaho, fire department had more runs than in any previous year, and also made considerable progress in the way of improvements around buildings, especially at the Central station, the interior of which was entirely remodeled so that at present the apparatus room has a floor space of 70 feet in width, the depth from the front doors to those of the horses’ stalls being 42 feet. All the stalls, which were formerly alongside the apparatus, have been moved to the rear, the work being done without any interference in promptly responding to alarms. There are now nine stalls along the rear, leaving more floor room for the apparatus, the space now being about double what it was. These improvements cost about $700, all the work being done by the members of the department. One great improvement is the instrument for sounding telephone alarms. It cost $300 and is most useful. The city has been divided into four districts, which are tapped off on the big bell in the tower when an alarm comes in, thus giving the approximate location of the fire. During the year two more men have been added to the department, making a total of nineteen now on the force. A new hose wagon is being built in the city from plans made by Chief Twogood and his assistants. It will go into the Central fire station. It is of the very latest design, and will be equipped with the latest appliances. Plans are now being drawn by Chief Twogood for a new enginehouse, 56×60, to he constructed some time during the latter part of this year. These plans imbody a great many improvements and conveniences, which are only to be found in the most recently constructed enginchouses. It will have six stalls and the small engine in use at present will be housed there, the big one then being placed in regular service at the Central station. It will be drawn by three horses. The new house .will also he quarters for a chemical, as well as the hose wagon in service at present. One hundred and three alarms were answered during 1908—the greatest number in the history of the department. In 1907 the alarms numbered 75; in 1906, 56; in 1905, 75. To the great credit of the department it can be said that every fire was confined to the place of origin, and in no case has it got away from the firemen and spread to other buildings. This is a record to be proud of, especially when it is considered that the apparatus with which the men had to work usually consisted of one small steamer and two chemical engines. The valuation of the property on fire during the past year was $214,310. Property valued at a total of $42,884 was destroyed. The value of contents amounted to $73,700. The details follow: Loss on buildings. $15,322; loss on contents, $27,562: insurance on buildings, $85,050; insurance on contents, $36,950; paid on buildings, $13,609; on contents, $20,772; net loss, $10,463.

SHANNON BUILDING FIRE, X SHOWS WHERE PEOPLE WERE RESCUEDSIDE VIEW OF RUINS OF SHANNON BLOCK, NORWICH.

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