May Enlarge Philadelphia Filter.

May Enlarge Philadelphia Filter.

West Philadelphia Councilmen are a unit in demanding that $600,000 for the enlargement of the Belmont filtration plant and installation of bigger distributing mains throughout that secnon of the city shall be included in the projected $4,000,000 thirty year 4 per cent. loan. If this is not done they declare they will cast their combined 19 votes in both chambers against the measure. Convinced of the justice of their stand, the 19 Councilmen called upon Director Cooke and put before him the imperative need of West Philadelphia for an increased filtered water supply and request his support in urging upon Mayor Blankenburg and Councils the absolute necessity for providing the necessary funds. Chief Dunlap, of the Water Bureau, furnished the following statement to the delegation on the filtered water situation in the six wards comprised in the Belmont filtration district: “The population of West Philadelphia has increased from 148,548 in 1900 to 261.000 at the present time without any added addition to its distribution sysem in the way of large mains. The daily consumption of water in 1900 was 26,000,000 gallons; in 1906, 32,000,000 gallons, and the past year, 40,000,000 gallons. The mains are now carrying all the water their capacity will safely permit. The service and pressure in the major portion of this section of the city is poor, and to give even this poor service requires that the valves at the reservoir shall be throttled down every night in order that sufficient water can he stored to keep up the daylight supply. The improvements necessary consist of the following: One ten-million gallon pump at Belmont Station. Fortv-eight-inch pumping main from Belmont station to filter reservoir. Forty-eight-inch distributing main from Belmont filters to George’s Hill reservoir, and from this reservoir to the southern section of West Philadelphia by the way of 52d street. The rearrangement of the Belmont preliminary filters, in order that their capacity can be increased from 40,000,000 to 60,000,000 gallons a day. The slow sand filters are ample to take care of this quantity of preliminary filtered water. The entire cost will be $600,000.” Supplementing Chief Dunlap’s statement. Director Cooke said investigation had shown that shortage in the water supply in the district was in many instances due to the fact that many of the large apartment houses and hotels in West Philadelphia had their own water pumps for lifting the filtered water from the mains to tanks on the roofs to assure a water supply on each floor. The result, the Director said, was that the distributing mains were drained, and as a consequence even two-story houses in the neigh borhood were short of water when the private pumps were in operation.

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