MEETING OF THE NEW ENGLAND WATERWORKS ASSOCIATION.

MEETING OF THE NEW ENGLAND WATERWORKS ASSOCIATION.

The annual meeting of The New England Waterworks association, held at the Hotel Brunswick, Boston, on Wednesday, January 8, was very successful both on account of the attendance and the program prepared for the occasion. There cannot be any doubt as to the resourcefulness of the association in providing subjects, and this was particularly apparent at this meeting. After luncheon the retiring president, John C. Whitney, addressed those present, reviewing briefly the standing of the association and what had been accomplished during the past year. The list of deaths was large, embracing many valued members, among whom was V. C. Hastings, superintendent of Concord, N. H., who had been a faithful member for many years. The roll, be said, showed a net gain of eighteen new members for the year and a total membership to date of 702. He regretted to say that, notwithstanding the earnest efforts made to increase the New England membership, there was still forty per cent, of superintendents in places of over 3,000 population in New England not represented. He complimented the editor of the Journal upon the successful management of that periodical and expressed his satisfaction at the Springfield meeting. In concluding Mr. Whitney stated that a committee of five had been appointed to prepare specifications on hydrants, which he considered was an important move. The secretary reported a total of 702 members—a gain of eighteen during the year. The treasurer’s report showed a net balance on hand of $4,480.30. The report of the editor gave a tabulated statement, with full details of the amount of matter published in the Journal and the cost of printing. The Journal contained 500 pages of reading matter and a total of 6(19 pages, including advertising. The amount received for the twenty-eight pages of advertising was $1,900, and the number of copies issued was 780. The finance committee reported $4,48030 on hand. Chairman Dexter Brackett, of the committee on specifications for cast iron pipe, stated that no further report had been prepared. He stated, however, that there had been considerable correspondence on the subject, especially with the committee of the American Waterworks association. It would be remembered that at the annual meeting of that association a report on the subject was read which closely corresponded to that of the New England association. The principal difference between the two was that the tables of the American called for heavier pipes than those of the New England. So far he could not see that there was any specification that the New England association could approve of, as no improvement had been made over the specifications which it had adopted. He thought it would be very advantageous if standard specifications should be adopted, which would meet with the approval of all concerned. The report of the tellers on ballot for officers for the current year was read and showed that A. E. Martin, superintendent of the waterworks at Springfield, Mass., was elected president; M. X. Baker, vicepresident and the present secretary, treasurer, editor and advertising agent, were re-elected to these positions. The total number of votes cast was -131 he first paper on “Experience with gas-producer plant,” by Harry L. Thomas, assistant superintendent of Water company, llingham, Mass., was then read by the author. 1 his paper proved interesting and brought forth considerable discussion, in which Messrs. Gowan, Barbour. Castle, Fuller. Crowther: and others took part. Mr. Crowthers, who i: engineer of the gas-producing plants con structed by R. D. Wood and Co., stated tha those constructed by the company for variou: purposes range up to 500-h. p., but there ar other plants in operation up to 4,000-h. p. The initial cost of installation of gas-producing plants exceeded that of steam pumping machinery by probably twenty per cent.; but the maintenance of gas plants was less than those of steam. F. A. Barbour gave his experience with a gas-producing plant and stated that the result was such that in installing a pumping plant again he would not hesitate to adopt the non-producing process. The paper on “One year’s practical everyday experience with an automobile for business, by a waterworks man,” by F. F. Forbes, superintendent of waterworks, Brookline, Mass., was read by the author. He stated that he had kept careful record of the cost of maintaining an automobile as compared with that of a horse. His opinion was that, while it cost about $1.50 a day to maintain an auto, it was more advantageous, as the saving in time alone was so much greater than could be expected from the use of a horse. The paper on “Action of water on water pipes,” by Freeland Howe, jr., chemist and bacteriologist, Norway, Me., proved interesting, and its reading was followed by a short discussion.

Willard Kent, Secretary New England Waterworks Association.L. M. Bancroft, Treasurer New England Waterworks Association.Charles W. Sherman, Editor New England Waterworks Association.R. J. Thomas, Advertising Agent N. E. Waterworks Association.
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