Meterage Avoids Enlargement of Water Works

Meterage Avoids Enlargement of Water Works

Meterage has been responsible for much saving in respect to waste of water, but a new credit can now be given to it. In Middletown, Conn., according to the 52d annual report of the water commissioners, the city has been saved the expense of enlarging the water works by the adoption of the meterage system. For several years, it seems, especially in the dry season, there had been a threatened shortage, which, with the natural increase in population, became at last acute. The consulting engineers, called in by the board, after an exhaustive examination, reported that, not only were the facilities of the water system ample to supply the city, but that the consumption was greatly in excess of the normal amount a town of the size of Middletown should use. Thus, while in 1891, the per capita daily consumption was 90 gals., in 1914 it had increased to 133 gals, per capita. The engineers recommended the adoption of meterage to curb the wastage that apparently was running riot among the city’s water users. The result followed that from 133 gals, daily consumption in 1914 the amount of water used dropped to 78 gals, in 1918, and not only that, but 80 per cent of the consumers were found to be paying less with the meterage system than on the old flat rate. The consequence of this great saving in water consumption has been that the city has been saved the necessity of enlarging the water works for several years to come, it being estimated by the engineers that with the present rate of growth the water supply should last until 1940.

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