Meterage Increases Receipts

Meterage Increases Receipts

From several sources it appears that the receipts of water departments, in spite of the increased cost of labor and materials, have been most satisfactory for 1918, and have exceeded those of the previous year. While there have been many reasons for this, the one that seems to stand out most prominently is that of the increased use of meters. This has been brought about by the economy that has been possible under the meterage system, the decrease in the consumption of water, and the consequent saving in pumpage and fuel. One instance of this is to be found in the annual report of H. H. Frost, superintendent of the Akron, Ohio, water department. Owing to the fact that 5,500 more meters were in operation than during the previous year, a great decrease in water consumption is reported. In January, 1919, the number of gallons consumed daily was 16,390,000, which, according to the record, was 1,070,000 less than January, 1918. Another instance is that of Canton, Ohio, which, in 1919, it is said, will realize approximately $300,000 from water rentals, revenue from which during the twelve months of 1918 amount to $238,234.10. This increase will come almost entirely from the use of meters. These are only two of the many instances that are constantly coming to our notice in which meters play the most important part in the matter of water works economy.

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