METERAGE NOT NEGLECTED.

METERAGE NOT NEGLECTED.

Although Watertown, Mass., enjoys the full abundance of the Metropolitan system’s supply, it does not allow the water furnished it to be wasted. It has 1,427 meters set, out of 1,583 services (over ninety per cent.), and will thus come in for a rebate of nearly $3,400 of the $30,000 out of the annual assessment paid in to the Metropolitan water supply commission by all of the several towns of the district, taxed upon the population and valuation. This rebate the Metropolitan devotes to those towns generally metering all their water services, and is based upon the number of services metered. The assessment of the town for 1901 will be $6,228, and will probably increase to thirty-six per cent, or more by 1904. After that it is not expected that there will be any further increase, as the income of the Metropolitan water district, it is thought, will then be increasing faster than the expenses. The water rates of Watertown by meter during 1900 amounted to $23,273.88; by fixture, to $2,022.75; rent of meters, $2,500.07. The total amount of main pipe laid is 181,400 feet; hydrants, 302; gates, 379; standpipes for watering carts, fourteen. The present water supply of the town is furnished from the pumping station at Chestnut Hill, where a pressure is maintained equivalent to a head of 256 feet above Boston city base. The Fisher Hill reservoir, into which the supply had an overflow, has a head of high water of 251 feet. The supply has now also been connected with the open reservoir, formerly used by Newton, upon Waban Hill. This has a head of 265 feet. The closed reservoir upon the same hill, now used by Newton, has a head of 320 feet. The top of the standpipe npon Whitney Hill had an elevation of but 229.7 feet. Watertown’s water commissioners are follows: Bennett F. Davenport; Charles Brigham; Thomas J. Gavin. The superintendent is John H. Perkins.

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