Michigan Board of Health on Water Supplies of the State

Michigan Board of Health on Water Supplies of the State

In its report on the domestic water supplies of Michigan, the State Board of Health has put its knowledge at the service of citizens by publishing the facts with reference to the various supplies, numbering about 250. Thirty are pronounced unsafe for domestic use, and users of wells are specially cautioned to have frequent bacteriological tests made, particularly where the wells are shallow. The State requires of all municipalities or corporations operating water treatment plants, a monthly report, which shall cover the operations in detail. By this means it has been possible to keep in touch with the quality of water supplied and to be really informed as to the efficacy of different methods of treatment. On the other hand, there is great value to the consumers of water because of the interest which the inspection and advice of the State Board arouses. Considerable variety is found in the sources of supply—deep wells, shallow wells, springs, shallow collecting system, the Great Lakes, rivers, and smaller lakes. Ihe supply is oftentimes cared for by the municipality, sometimes it is a private company that furnishes it to the houses, and sometimes a combination, as when Dearborn owns the mains and buys its water from Henry Ford. A fairly large proportion of the supplies are treated. There was much use of hypochlorites formerly, hut within a year or two the practice has shifted to liquid chlorine.

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