MISCELLANY

MISCELLANY

THE LONDON FIRE BRIGADE,

Captain Shaw has decided that fire inquests would prove both annoying and expensive, and are not necessary. It is time that Captain Shaw made up his mind to get the fire brigade of London into a state of efficiency at any rate equal 10 that of a third-rate American town. The idea all around seems to be that he is the one authority in this world on matters of his department, and that it Is a piece of gross impertinence to differ in the slightest iota from his opinion. The Insurance and Finance Leader says: “He is constantly complaining that he has not enough tnen, engines or appliances. That this is so is notorious, and it is in a great measure his own fault; one of these days the long-prophesied calamity will come ; a Wood >trcet fire will be in progress simultaneously with such a one as Whitcley’s, and one will have 10 be left alone ; then Captain Shaw may be certain that the public will turn on him, and he will he made the scapegoat. He has set himself up as the top pinnacle of the fire brigade, and to him the general London public look ; they know nothing of the Board of Works control and of the many vexatious restrictions put on him by so-c3lled superiors. To them Captain Shaw and the fire brigade are synonymous terms. Let him use his popularity and compel those in authority to give him all he needs to make the brigade efficient—if he is in earnest when he says he wants it. By resigning, and informing the public why he did so, he would raise a scare in the metropolis that would put The Telegraph fright altogether into ihe shade, and all he wanted would be granted. He need not be afraid that lie would sutler by it or lose his place. The very act suggested would increase his popularity with the mob and middle class of London, who would emphatically refuse to be without the well advertised, if slightly ornamental, chief of the Metropolitan File Brigade.”

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