Mixing Concrete Is Difficult Tusk

Mixing Concrete Is Difficult Tusk

So simple does it seem to mix cement, sand, stone and water, and embed therein steel rods, that the ordinary mind untrained in the refinements of technical calculation is apt to overlook the fact that a complicated theory underlies the construction. There are, consequently, builders who, while they would not dare to undertake a steel structure, yet consider themselves sufficiently “practical” to take a hand at reinforced concrete. Incompetence is thus too often set on high, and no more vengeful Juggernaut was ever enthroned to To exact plan and to superintend tribute of suffering reinforced and concrete death. construction—we cannot repeat calls for more than the exnerience and common sense of the so-called “practical” man; it is eminently work for the trained engineer. An emphatic demonstration of this is the remains of a motion-picture theater on Eastern avenue, Cincinnati, O., which was to have opened on New Year’s day with a grand free-for-all showtor as many women and children in the neighborhood as could crowd it. For weeks every child in the neighborhood had been watching the completion of the new picture theater; and many of them were all joy, for their mothers had promised to take them to that free show on New Year’s day. By an act of the merciful hand of Providence, however, none of them attended; for, on December 10, the nearly completed theater, without preliminary warning long enough to give the unsuspecting workmen a chance to escape, collapsed to the ground, carrying with it the 10 workers who happened to be in the structure, instead of that happy throng of women and children. Had the structure stood until that opening day, it is conceded by all that it would have been the deathtrap for 200 or more mothers and their children. As it is now, the story is three dead, six seriously injured, and one bruised.

The building was a re_____nforced concrete substructure of columns, beams and slabs, with brick side and end walls forming the theatre proper. The concrete work was originally designed by an engineer employed by the architect; but it appears that the owner, on account of the high bids received, engaged a “practical” builder, who prepared his own plans, modifying the work of both the architect and the engineer, and agreeing to do the work for much less than the amount of the lowest bid. Neither architect nor engineer had anything to do with the supervision of the erection. Even the plans on which the building permit was issued were not followed out exactly, one column being omitted, thus increasing span between columns; and though the building commissioner required that the details of the girder to support the floor across this span b e submitted, the builder failed to submit them. The collapse occurred while the forms were being removed. The concrete had been in place only 18 day s. the weather being generally cold and tor a considerable part of the time below freezing. The folly of the whole thing, however, is strikingly shown in the way the steel was placed, no intelligent care whatsoever having been exercised. The rods in the girders were simply bunched together along the bottom, without being spaced so as to enable the steel to have any effective grip.

STATION OF ENGINE 92 AND LADDER TRUCK 44, AT MORRIS AVENUE AND 169TH STREET, EQUIPPED WITH MOTOR APPARATUS.

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