MODERN DELUGE FIRE STREAMS

MODERN DELUGE FIRE STREAMS

Big streams are recognized as the surest and safest means to stop fires from developing into conflagrations or when they have gained some headway and offer an effectual stop to their progress. Some years ago special tools for this purpose were devised and placed on the market with a result that a great many fire departments throughout the United States and Canada are equipped with the apliances. They consist of large nozzles fed y siamese streams furnished by hydrant or pumping engine pressure, with holders which enable the most powerful stream to be handled by one person. In figure 1 will be seen five of these streams fed from one hydrant, each stream being controlled by a single fireman. In this case the pressure is taken direct from the hydrant and no Siamese used. It will be seen that the nozzles are resting on holders and directed with ease by one man to each stream. It is true that large powerful streams are an absolute necessity for extinguishing a large blaze and small streams are effective only for small fires. As water is composed of two highly inflammable ingredients, oxygen and hydrogen, at ”13 degrees Fahrenheit water is turned into the natural gases and becomes inflammable. Chemists well understand this as does the blacksmith who wets his coal and sprinkles water on his fire for the purpose of making it burn longer and with more intense heat. Better an excess of equipment for the prevention of large fires, even if the liability is remote, than regret over ruins of property that should have been saved. The deluge sets were invented and perfected to provide as near as possible security against disastrous conflagrations. They are simple, practical and efficient and throw large powerful streams 50 to too feet greater distance, from the same ordinary pressure, than is possible to force a smaller size stream. A modern deluge stream will leave its black mark wherever it strikes on the large blaze. Modern deluge sets have a large reservoir of water directly back of the nozzle, the water not being obliged to pass through any crooks or bends. They can be carried on any piece of apparatus and are especially adapted for use on motor machines. They can be placed in operation anywhere lines of hose can be laid, in alleyways, inside of buildings, from roofs, or among lumber piles where it is impossible to operate other nozzles. Figure 2 shows a 3-inch solid deluge stream thrown 335 feet with 83 pounds pressure at Concord, N. H. This nozzle is self-supporting under pressure, resting on a holder with wooden platform for base. Figure 3 illustrates a stream thrown through a line of 3-inch hose and 3-inch nozzle with 125 pounds pressure. The three-way deluge set operates with three lines connected to Siamese, as used from hydrant or engine, and holder and high pressure platform and large streams are produced from 50 to 75 feet greater distance, with same pressure, than it is possible to throw small streams. The fourway deluge set consists of a four-way Siamese with four 2 1/2-inch inlets with automatic valves and a section of 3 1/2-inch cotton rubber-lined hose, together with holder and tripod, and 3 1/2-inch reducer, also five sizes of nozzles, 1 1/2-, 1 5/8-, 1 3/4-, 3 and 2 1/8-inch, with one 254-inch “Y,” the arrangement being such that the four-way deluge set may be connected up from hydrant or engine with four lines of 2 1/2-inch hose attached to Siamese, operating with deluge holder and high pressure platform. In a recent trial four streams from a motor fire engine at Marietta were placed in operation. The two first streams from these modern high pressure nozzles were directed by one person, while the two other streams from ordinary nozzles required several men. The old methods of handling large streams have given place to the modern practice as by the old way they were neither safe nor practical.

Figure 1. Five Eastman Deluge Sets From One Hydrant at Attleboro, Mass.Figure 3. Three-inch Stream Eastman Deluge Set and High Pressure Platform.Figure 2. A Stream From 3-inch Eastman Nozzle, 125 Pounds Pressure, at Pump House, Walter A. Wood Mowing and Reaping Machine Company.

No posts to display