Monthly Report of the District of Columbia Fire Marshal

Monthly Report of the District of Columbia Fire Marshal

The report of the transactions of the District of Columbia fire marshal’s office for the month of September shows that during the month 128 alarms of fire were received, a decrease of 18 as compared with the number received the preceding month. Of the 128 alarms of fire received, 07 were box alarms and 61 local or telephone calls. Of the box alarms received, 17 were false, and of the local alarms, five were false. The following is a list of the style of buildings and places in which fire originated and in buildings where needless alarms were sounded, and where no fires were found: Forty-nine brick buildings, four of which were needless alarms, 33 frame buildings, 7 automobiles, 1 brush, 2 dumps, 4 rubbish, 1 freight car, 1 wrong location, 1 fence. 5 street cars, 1 manure pile, 1 coal pile, total 100. besides 22 false alarms. The loss caused by the 67 box alarms is estimated at $272,705. The loss caused by the 61 local or telephone calls is estimated at $2,190. The total estimated loss is $274,895. This loss is an increase of $131,412 as compared with the loss for the preceding month and an increase of $272,395 as compared with the loss for the same month last year, September, 1917. During the month only one fire occurred which necessitated the sounding of additional alarms of fire; this one with five others are the fires where the loss for each exceeds $1,000. The loss for the 95 other fires, not counting false and needless alarms, is estimated at $11,870. Number of fires that occurred without loss, 53; number of fires that occurred with loss, 48; false alarms, 22; needless alarms, 4; company sent to wrong location, 1. Total number of alarms received, 128. Loss on buildings, $61,435; loss on contents, $213,460. The inspection of mercantile establishments is still being vigorously pursued; during the month the number of inspections numbered 1,038, and from the beginning of the fiscal year, July 1, 1918, up to and including September 30, 1918, 3,929 inspections were made, and these inspections do not include the investigation of all alarms of fire and the inspections of theatres.

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