MORE AUXILIARY PIPE LINES.

MORE AUXILIARY PIPE LINES.

Assitant Fire Chief Rebbeck, of the Cleveland, Ohio, fire department, would have the auxiliary pipe line system of the city extended at least to Erie street, so as to afford better protection to the large buildings which have been erected between the Public square and that street within the past few years. At present the system extends only to Sheriff street on Enclid avenue by way of Ontario street. It would cost a great deal of money to lay the pipe, if new material were to be used on the new line, but, it is claimed, it would be money well expended. One of the advantages to the property owners would certainly be a decrease in the insurance rate. Cleveland was the first city in the country to adopt the pipe system, and when its pipes were laid there was an element of experiment about the enterprise. Four six-inch pipes were laid from the river to the top of the hill on Ontario street; and for a time they were adequate. The city has grown so rapidly, however, during the past few years that thost pipes might not now be adequate in event of a conflagration in the downtown district of the city. The laying of ten-inch pipes is, therefore, advocated. The existing six-inch pipe, being in good repair, could be used in making the extension east to Erie street. Such a plan would be economical. The extension must be made soon, for there are a number of large buildings at the corner of Euclid avenue and Erie street and Erie and Prospect streets, and several more will be erected soon, some this year, it is said. Chief Rebbeck said that, while nothing definite had been decided upon by the officials of the department relative to the extension of the pipe system, an effort was being made to perfect a plan for the improvement that would meet with the approval of the members of the city council.

The council of Chicago has voted $70,000, with which to purchase a new steel fireboat at a cost of $50,000, and to lay down pipe lines in the downtown district for the use of the city’s fireboats. The necessity for these pipe lines has been shown by the recent large fires in the heart of the city and in the West Side manufacturing centre—especially those of the last month. Heavier pressure is needed in these districts, and an abundance of water. To obtain this tea-inch mains will be laid from the river south in Wabash and Michigan avenues, with branches to Dearborn and State streets. Other lines will be in Monree and other east and west streets from the river to La Salle street. On the West Side lines will b« laid to protect the immense factory district between Clinton and Canal streets ai.d Adams and Fulton streets. On all of these lines there will be separate hydrants, and through an auxiliary pipe laid besides the water lines to the river, firemen at the scene of a fire can telegraph to the boats by means of a complete telegraph system. Each of the two boats now in use in the downtown district, can throw 65.000 gallons of water a minute. Each has two pumps, and, witn the addition of the new threepump boat, the combined force of boats can throw 22,000 gallons of water every minute.

A complete system of water works is to be constructed at Branford Conn., by the Branford Electric Company. $80,000 in bonds has been issued.

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