More Water Needed in Chicago

More Water Needed in Chicago

Chicago seems to be somewhat in the position of Coleridge’s “Ancient Mar ner.” with “water, water everywhere, but not a drop to drink.” With a big lake at its very doors, hundreds – possibly thousands—of its buildings, whose owners pay the city for water, have to pay a private company for electric’ty to pump it up to the third floor, and this although the people own one of the best and cheapest electric power plants in theworld. That this is not utilized as it ought to be is not due to ignorance on the part of the city authorities, who have been fully instructed over and over again that the present lowpressure conditions would soon be relieved and the cost of pumping reduced by a scientific application of the electric power of the sanitary district to the water department. It is true that the trustees of the sanitary district oppose any such application of the power plant; but the city ought to be supreme in such a case, and not suffer itself to be dominated by what is in reality a coal sellers’ trust. As a further argument in favor of the need of an adequate water supply is a recent disastrous fire which caused a loss of $100,000 and might have been avoided if tbe water supply had not been insufficient. The stock yards’ owners also call out for a sufficient supply in their district and their cry is reechoed in other sections of the city. That such a condition should exist is due not only to the mayor, but also to all who to-day are administering the affairs of the city and the sanitary district, as well as to their predecessors for many years back.

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