Motor Fire Truck for Mine Rescue Work

Motor Fire Truck for Mine Rescue Work

The companying illustration shows the general design of an American motor truck built for mine rescue work. The compartments carry a wonderful variety of scientific paraphernalia such as pulmotors. oxygen pumps, tanks, respirators, and fire extinguishers, as well as explosive materials, a complete underground telephone system and a full stock of miners’ and firemen’s tools, together with a complete ambulance equipment and medical supplies. This motor truck was designed to aid in the rescue of entombed coal mine victims. This vehicle is used to great advantage to expedite relief work during mine disasters and it will be seen in an ambulance, hospital, excavator, fire and gas fighter, all in one. It is said that government experts and coal operators arranged for an explosion for official test and predict by its use a great reduction in casualties. It is pointed out that in order to rescue, revive and treat entombed and injured miners and thus reduce the loss of life and lessen the injuries resulting from the periodic disasters in the coal mines of the United States, the Bureau of Mines of the Department of Interior has evolved a new plan of relief work involving the extensive, use of motor rescue trucks of a special design equipped with all the paraphernalia known in the science of relief work. It may be stated that the first vehicle of the new type built according to government specifications and seen on the photograph was constructed at Cleveland, Ohio, and delivered to the Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, Pa. It is a veritable hospital, carrying every piece of portable equipment that is useful in rescuing miners, quenching flames, resuscitating the unconscious and administering first aid. It may also be mentioned that included in the equipment are two pulmotors, six oxygen tanks, fifty regenerators, an oxygen pump, two stretchers, a life line, box of explosives, lanterns, tents, fire extinguishers, complete telephone system and a full complement of hose, axes, saws, miner’s tools and medical and surgical supplies. The equipment is complete even to the extent of providing for the bird and cage that are used in detecting poisonous gases in mine shafts. It is held that a majority of the members of the American Mine Safety Association, who saw the first truck in operation during their recent convention in Pittsburgh, predicted a big reduction in casualties. A mine explosion, with all its effects except human injury was staged during the convention and the truck with its full equipment was tested by government rep resentatives while moving picture operators also employed by the government recorded every act and movement to show absent mine operators how lives can be saved and danger lessened The bureau of mines, it is said, has proposed that mine-owners in each district establish motor rescue stations at central points from which each district may be served. This phase of safety in mine work was one of the principal topics of discussion at the convention, all of the members of the asociation showing a keen interest in the new motor vehicle. As instant access to everything is essential the truck body has been built with a special place for everything it carries. And everything must be in its proper place. To this end, the entire carrying space, except for the crew of trained rescuers, consists of compartments of varying size and odd shape nearly all opening on the outside of the truck by means of snatch hooks. There are provided under the driver’s seat ten reviving outfits. Six oxygen tanks are carried beneath the body on a specially built subframe and cradle, the tanks lying crosswise of the truck so that they may be pulled out quickly when necessary. On the left side of the chassis frame there is attached an oxygen pump, which is operated by the power of the motor. In back of the driver’s seat there are hooks for a five-foot crowbar and tent poles. It will be seen in the illustration that immediately back of the driver’s seat and extending the full height of the truck there is a series of compartments opening on the outside of the truck. These compartments carry a tent. 22 feet of hose, three miners’ picks, three miners’ shovels, one fourpound sledge and two hand axes. In back of these compartments are two scats, arranged lengthwise, with folding lazy-backs and protected by a brass railing. Beneath the seats there is a series of smaller compartments. Beneath the rear steps there is another compartment, with doors at each side and in the end. There are also shallow drawers to take saws, hose couplings, reducers, spanners and 200 feet of half inch rope. It is of interest to note that the central compartment along the sides of the body contain one life line reel, a telephone system, part of which is carried into the mine, and an assortment of compasses, braces, bits, chisels, hacksaws, blades and snatch blocks. Suspended on the outside of the body on specially designed hooks and clamps are stretchers, fire extinguishers, axes, lanterns, etc. There are special boxes built on the running boards to accommodate a large number of mine lanterns and small boxes arc built on the rear wall of the forward compartment to carry two first-aid boxes and a pump. The truck is equipped with an eight-inch swivel headlight, mounted on the dash and is fitted with non skid tires.

FIRST-AID CAR FOR MINE RESCUE WORK.

A verbal contract was agreed to recently be tween Mayor Milam, of Raleigh, N. C., and the Harris Air Lift Company, of Indianapolis. Ind„ which contracts to save the city fully 10 per cent, in the cost of current necessary to operate the wells at the south side water plant by the use of a device for lifting water. According to the terms of the contract, the Harris company agrees to pump the water into the intake, the cost to the city for current to be 20 per cent, less than under the present system. The average cost per month at the south side plant has been $4,719. By the use of this device the cost of operation can be reduced 20 per cent.

No posts to display