Motor Pumping Engine Tested at Ogden City

Motor Pumping Engine Tested at Ogden City

At a test of its new American-La France motor pumping engine last week, the Ogden City, Utah, fire department showed that with this new addition it could successfully combat fire in any of the tallest buildings in the city. One of the most notable exhibitions was that on the Eccles building, one of the city’s skyscrapers. The first test was made with the ordinary city pressure, through a usual length of hose and the standpipe to the top of the structure. There were two lines of hose, each 600 feet in length, to the rear of the Eccles building from the hydrant at the First National Bank corner. At the Eccles building the two lines were Siamesed into a three-inch stand pipe running to the roof, a distance of 106 feet, with a 100-foot length of two and a half-inch hose attached to the roof and running to the 24th street corner. A one-inch smooth bore nozzle was used. The hydrant pressure was 85 pounds, the nozzle pressure 20, and the supply was 132 1/2 gallons per minute. But when the pump was attached to these same lines, with pressure varying from 300 to 340 pounds, the pressure at the nozzle jumped to 140 pounds and 350 gallons of water shot from the hose each minute. So strong was this pressure that the firemen shot a stream of water over Hudson avenue, a half block away. The third test was made by doubling 1,000 feet of hose on Washington avenue, north from 24th street. The pump pressure of 300 to 340 pounds brought a nozzle pressure of 100 pounds and 295 gallons of water per minute. Then two 50foot sections of 2j4-inch hose was Siamesed into a deluge set, using a two-inch nozzle. The pump pressure was 100 pounds, the nozzle pressure 57 pounds and 880 gallons of water were thrown in a minute. For the fifth test, three 50-foot sections of 2 1/2-inch hose were attached, using one one-inch nozzle tip and two tips of l 1/4-inches. The pump pressure was 110, the nozzle pressure was 72, 65 and 65 pounds, respectively for the three and 995 gallons per minute were thrown. Chief Canfield then ordered tests at the Ogden River bridge, where a ten-foot lift was necessary. Two 50-foot sections of 2 1/2-inch hose were Siamesed into a deluge set, using a twoinch nozzle. The pump pressure was 80 to 85 pounds, with nozzle pressure of from 40 to 44 pounds, the pump providing 760 to 790 gallons per minute. With 1,000 feet of hose, pump pressure of 245 pounds and nozzle pressure of 78 pounds, the pump supplied 260 gallons per minute. With three lines of hose 50 feet in length, with two nozzles of 1¾ Inches and one of one-inch, the supply was 880 gallons per minute. The tests were made in the presence of Commissioners Flygare and Browning, Assistant Supt. Taylor of the water works department. Chief Canfield and representatives of the Pacific Coast Underwriters’ Association, who all expressed pleasure at the improvement made in the fire department by the addition of the equipment.

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