MUNICIPAL PENSION SYSTEM.

MUNICIPAL PENSION SYSTEM.

EDITORIAL

In working out the problem of municipal pensions New York at present is attracting the attention of a great many cities through the country which have in mind the same plan. As an innovation in municipal government it is replete with complications that will require deep study on the part of sound and conservative, as well as judicial minds. To say just how far a city’s obligation extends to care for employes who have grown old in its service may never be satisfactorily determined—experiment will at least be necessary to try out the problem. The purpose of New York is to establish a civil pension system which will provide retirement funds for all municipal employes. As it will be necessary to take the matter to the State Legislature, it is doubtful about attaining much headway this year, as that body contemplates adjournment in March. However, that may be the best thing that could happen, as it will give the projectors additional time to work out the scheme, in spite of the contention that the city’s efficient conduct in the future is in a measure based on the successful carrying out of the system. Here, as in most cities, members of the fire and police departments have been generally cared for in the matter of pensions, but under the new system all other department employes will be benefited. A civil pension system with such a scope seems just and proper, for what could be devised to encourage and foster loyalty and faithfulness on the part of an employe more than a guarantee that at a certain age he would be retired on an income sufficient to baffle straitened circumstances? The absence of such a guarantee, on the other hand, stimulates negligence, encourages indifference and incites dishonesty. The magnitude of the civil pension propaganda is rich with human interest, and if the promoters live to see the fruition of their efforts it will be a long stride toward the coalescence of employer and employe.

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