Municipal Record.

Municipal Record.

FROM SPECIAL CORRESPONDENCE TO FIRK AND WATER.

Incorporation, Population, Water-works, Paving, Sewerage, Street Lighting, Fire Department, Financial Condition and List of Municipal Officers of Cities, Towns and Villages in the United States and Canada.

SAN BERNARDINO, CAL., has a population of 10,000. It has under way a complete system of water-work and other city improvements. Its officers are : Mayor, O. Newburg ; trustees, A. M. Kenniston, W. E. W. Lightfoot, Sydney Uhl and Harry Lesher ; city clerk, B. B. Harris ; treasurer, C. F. Roe; attorney, John Brown, Jr.; superintendent of streets, Joseph Bright, and city engineer, F. C. Finkle.

WAYNESBURG, PA.-J. A. F. Randolph, town clerk, writes: “In your issue of February 22, i8qo, under the head of ‘Municipal Record,’ you quote Waynesburg, Pa., as having sixty gasolene lamps. We are glad to inform you that our town is now lighted by one hundred electric lights. It is thought by a good many that there is no town in the State of the same size that is better lighted. Our water-works also have as good pressure probably as any in the State, giving us about no to 115 pounds to the square inch on Main street. While we have no sewerage system, our town is well located for natural drainage.”

THE PERFECTION NOZZLE HOLDER.

SANTA ROSA, CAL., is a city with 8000 inhabitants. The names of its officers are : Mayor, H. W. Byington ; chief clerk, H. H. Churchill; treasurer, E. E. Woodward; chairman of finance committee, L. W. Burris; city civil engineer, Press K. Davis ; chief of police, J. J. Lowrey ; chief of fire department, W. H. Grissim ; chairman of fire and water committee, J. W. Warboys; president of water board, M. L. McDonald ; health officer, J. J. Lowrey. Basalt block is used for street paving with stone sidewalks. The city has a sewerage and a waterworks system. The latter which is gravity is owned by the Santa Rosa Water Company. The streets are lighted with gas and electricity (Thomson-Houston system). No additions are proposed for the fire department just now. The yearly expenditures and receipts are $35,000 respectively. No bonds.

LEBANON, Ohio.—This town has 3000 inhabitants. Its officers are: Mayor, I. N. Walker; city clerk, M. E. Gustin ; treasurer, J. M. Oglesby; chairman of finance committee, George W. Smith ; chief of police, J. T. Starry ; chief of fire department, E. Sellers ; chairman of fire and water committee, West Glenny; street inspector, J. T. Starry; health officer, Isaac Smith. Ten miles of streets are paved with stone, brick and mecadam, and lighted with about 100 electric lights by the Lebanon Light, Fuel and Power Company. The town has no water-works nor sewerage system. Water for fire protection is obtained from cisterns. The total debt of the town is $4500, the annual expenses and receipts being $11,845 and $20,275 respectively. Six per cent is paid on bonds.

WATERBURY, Conn.—“ This city,” writes our correspondent, “ was incorporated in 1853, and has a population estimated at 35,000. The following is a list of its officers : Mayor, Henry 1. Houghton ; city clerk, Edward G. Kilduff ; treasurer, William C. Keenan ; chairman of finance committee, Henry I. Houghton; city civil engineer, F. Floyd Weld; superintendent of water-works, N. J. Welton; superintendent of street lighting, Frank J. Kansetti; chief of police, George M. Egan ; chief of fire department, Samuel C. Snagg; chairmen of fire and water committee, Henry I. Houghton and N. J. Welton ; president of water board, N. J. Welton ; street inspector, James M. Colley; health officer, Dr. C. W. S. Frost; fire alarm superintendent, Samuel C. Snagg. Granite blocks are used for paving the streets, and they are lighted with 150 electric lights by the Connecticut Electric Company. The water-works system which is a gravity system is owned by the city. There are 238 hydrants in use and about thirty-six miles of pipe laid. No extensions to sewerage nor additions to the fire department equipment are proposed at present. The total city debt is $377,500, the yearly expenditure $185,000, and the receipts $190,000. Four and seven per cent is paid on bonds.

Municipal Record.

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Municipal Record.

FROM SPECIAL CORRESPONDENCE TO FIRE AND WATER.

Incorporation, Population, Water-works, Paving, Sewerage, Street Lighting, Fire Department, Financial Condition and List of Municipal Officers of Cities, Towns and Villages in the United States and Canada.

WARREN. TRUMBULL COUNTY, O.—The city received its charter in 1869. “It has now,” writes our correspondent, “an estimated population of 8000. The city officials are: Mayor, John L. Smith; president of city council, O. Messer; chairman of fire and water committee, Al. C. Hurst; city clerk, Geo. H. Quimhy; chief of fire department, H. B. Drennen; assistant chief, Jas. E. Jeffries; city marshal, John W. Brooks; city engineer, Samuel F. Dickey. The principal streets have good stone pavements. There is also an excellent system of sewers. The school buildings are not equalled by any city in Ohio of its class. We have eight fine brick school buildings. The central high school building cost $40,000, the other ward schoo) houses cost $8000 apiece. The city at present is lighted with gas by the Warren Gas Light Company, but we have recently contracted with the Warren Electric Light and Power Company for seventy arc lights, the city to pay three cents per hour per light; twenty-five of them to burn all night, the rest until midnight. The system will be the Westinghouse. Warren was also fortunate in getting a good system of water-works, which were constructed in 1887 by Wm. Bullock of New York. It is a combined stand-pipe and direct system. The stand pipe is 140 feet high and twentyfive feet in diameter. We get an ordinary pressure of sixtyfive pounds and by pumping direct 150 pounds. The pumps, of Deane make, are two in number, with a daily capacity of 1,500,000 gallons each. There are twelve miles of mains and 103 fire hydrants, the city paying an annual rental of $4500 for the hydrants. Geo. H. Quimby is the superintendent and Horace Bushnell engineer. The mains are from sixteen to six inches in diameter. The city hall is a fine brick building and cost $40,000. It is three stories high. The first floor is occupied by the fire department, the force of which includes two full paid men (drivers) and twenty five volunteers. The apparatus consists of two Silsby steamers, one large twohorse hose cart and two hand hose carts, 2000 feet of good hose, and one hook and ladder truck, drawn by two horses; the second floor of the house is occupied by the city officials, and the third is a good dancing hall. The city debt, including $18,000 of school debt, is only $28,000 on which six per cent interest is paid.”

CRYSTAL FALLS, Mich.—This village, incorporated in February, 1889, has about 1000 inhabitants. Its officers are: President, John H. Parks; city clerk, A. Lustfield; treasurer, D. F. Riordan; chairman of purchasing committee, D. C. Lockwood; marshal, Charles Henry; village attorney and chief of fire department, H. L. Flewelling; superintendent of water-works, F. Kleynstuber. The water-works system, which is a direct system, is owned by the village. There are fifteen fire hydrants and one mile of mains. There is no system of sewerage or public lighting at present, but the village will in the spring build and own an electric light plant. ‘I he Kratz system of fire alarm is in use, with three street boxes, and two miles of wire. The total village debt is $18,000 water bonds.