Nashville Fire Department.

Nashville Fire Department.

Nashville, Tenn., is a rapidly growing city and, to meet the need of fire protection in the extreme western portion of its limits, an extradouble-tank, 85-gal. chemical engine was placed in service in temporary quarters, last year at the car barns in Western Nashville. Chief A. A, Rozetta now recommends that a lot should be purchased and at up-to-date firehouse built upon it. On another lot owned by the city he would have an enginehouse fully equiped with men and apparatus. He also asks for the installation of four additional fire-alarm boxes. The department has fifteen stations and has the following equipment manned by no officers and men: Steam fire engines, 9; chemical engines, 2; aerial hook and ladder trucks, 2; hose wagon, with turretnozzle; combination hose and chemical wagons, 5; hose carriages, 4; hose, rubber, in good condition. 3.050 ft.; in fair condition, 1,750 ft.; cotton hose in good condition, 6,000 ft.; in fair condition, 3,765 ft.—total serviceable hose, 14,-550 ft. There was purchased during the year 650 ft. of Quadro-Triplet brand cotton hose, 950 ft. of Peerless Jacket cotton hose, 1,200 ft. of Maltese Cross brand rubber hose. Of chemical hose in good condition, there are 900 ft. There are sixty-four horses in service. The underground fire-alarm cable system has already four main ducts and seventeen laterals, with four more main ducts and four more laterals for boxes to be laid. During the past year the department answered 485 alarms, of which nineteen were false; two were second; and three were general alarms. The fire-loss was as follows: On buildings. $115,636.67, on contents, $149,459.58—total, $265,096.25. The insurance details are as under: Insurance on buildings, $1,503,326, on contents, $2,882,985total, $4,386,311; insurance over loss for the year, $4,121,214.50, total loss, $265,096.25—total insurance over loss, $3,856,118.25. Twelve of the fires were incendiary; 117 were of “unknown” origin. Twenty were caused by electrical wires; eighty-two by defective flues, stone pipe and burning chimneys; eighteen, by burning trash; sixty-six alarms unnecessary or false; and nineteen by children or rats and matches. A. A. Rozetta is chief—the twelfth since the paid fire department was organised; J. W. Weaver, assistant chief, Henry Brackman, superintendent of fire-alarm telegraph (Gamewell) and foreman of the machine shop. There are twenty-eight captains and lieutenants, thirty-six engineers and stokers, and twenty-five drivers. The total expenses for the year were $127,466.23, as against an appropriation of $127,465.

CHIEF A. A. ROZETTA, NASHVILLE, TENN

At Boston, Mass., fire from an unknown source broke out on the second floor of the 3-story wooden building at 1250 Washington street. The flames spread up the stairway to the vacant top floor.

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