Nashville Water Works Report

Nashville Water Works Report

Although less water was pumped by the Nashville, Tenn, waterworks department during 1915 than during the previous year, its revenue for 1913 exceeded its revenue for 1912 by more than $14,362.85, according to a summary prepared by Water Tax Assessor Turner H. Morton and submitted to Commissioner Robert Elliott. The summary is as follows: Total punipage for the year 1913, 4,178,884,000 gallons; average per day, 11,448,999 gallons; cost of coal for same, $15,792.81; total collections for the year, $317,035.82; total disbursements for the year, $221,025.37; total water furnished to the city free, 1913, $66,505.81; number of meters set, $1,550; total number of meters in use, 14,259; number of new connections, 1,148; bonds paid during the year, $50,000,000; total bonded debt, $1,422,000.00; new fire hydrants set, 160; water pipe laid, 6-inch, 54.000 feet; water pipe laid. 12-inch. 7,510 feet. The average daily punipage for 1912 was 12,125,603 gallons. The daily average for 1913 was 11.448.999 gallons. The revenue for 1913 exceeds that of 1912 by $14,302.85. The coal bill for 1913 exceeds the sum of 1912, by $599.55. This can lie explained by the fact that the old engines were run through the months of December and April, which caused the coal bill to increase, as the new AllisChalmers engine is more economical in the consumption of coal.

The newly purchased electrically driven pump for tlie water works department of Macon, Ga., has been put into regular service. The test proved highly satisfactory in everv way and the pump will be operated day and night, beginning early this week. With a capacity of one million gallons daily the pumr> will relieve the strain on the five million gallon steam pump at the Riverside pumping station. and is expected to mean a saving of several hundred dollars per month to the department. Chemists have made tests of the water and found it to be excellent, showing no gasforming organisms and said to be as pure as any in the country.

Nashville Water Works Report.

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Nashville Water Works Report.

The Waterworks Department of Nashville, Tenn., under the management of George Reyer, made a most excellent showing for the year 1910, according to the annual report of the department submitted by Mr. Reyer to the Board of Public Works. In addition to this the citizens of Nashville are enjoying a pure, clear water supply and due credit for this must be given to Superintendent Reyer, who installed the purification and clarification process, which has given such eminent satisfaction. Among other things to be found in the report are the following:

“The total pumpage for the year as shown by plunger displacement, without any deduction for slip, was 4,772,515,192 gallons, while the average |K-r day was 13,072,218 gallons. The actual delivery was probably 5 per cent. less. During the year the Holly engine was in service fifty hours, pumping 24,886,818 gallons. With this exception the supply was furnished by the AllisChalmcrs engine No. 4. The repairs on Worthington No. I have been about completed, all machine work is done and the engine is now being assembled. In overhauling this engine it was dismantled from pumps to steam end, and all worn parts either renewed or put in good condition, so that this engine should give good and fairly economical service for many years. The cost of repairs on No, I for 1910 was $6,675.89. There still remain engines No. 2 and No. 3 to be overhauled, as these engines have been in service about twenty years. The Allis-Chaltners engine and boilers are in good condition. The space occupied by the new boilers being much less than that required for the old boilers, a part of the boiler house was converted into a shop, and it is very convenient, as the lathes and machinery are now removed from the engine room. It is gratifying to notice the yearly increase in efficiency and economy in our pumping plant for the last three years. This is shown in the following statement: In 1907 the number of pounds of coal used was 40,115,100, at a cost of $38,361.25. The water pumped was 6,085,438,120 gallons, with an average daily pumpage of 10,672,400 to 12,012 consumers, and the revenue derived was $229,864.04. In 1908 the number of pounds of coal used was 38,654,100 pounds, at a cost of $30,459.42. The water pumped was 5,833,108,530 gallons with an average daily pumpage of 14,611,256 gallons to 12,585 consumers, and the revenue amounted to $241,141.10. In 1909 the number of pounds of coal used was 33,774,500, at a cost of $31,725.57. The amount of water pumped was 5,110,224,841 gallons, with an average daily pumpage of 14,000,610 to 13,427 consumers, and a revenue of $250,274.45. In 1910 the number of pounds of coal used was 17,801,800, at a cost of $16,479.06. The amount of water pumped was 4,772,515,192 gallons, with a daily pumpage of 13,072,218. to 14,342 consumers, and the revenue amounted to $261,005.44. Tremendous decreases both in the amount of coal used and in the amount expended for fuel are shown by comparing the figures for 1909 and 1910, while the increases both in the number of consumers and in amount of revenue are apparent. It will also be noted that as compared with 1907, the year 1908 also shows a saving of fuel and a consequent reduction in the cost of same. Within three years the quantity of coal used per year has been reduced from 40,115,100 pounds to 17,861,800 pounds: the pumpage has been reduced from 6,085,438,126 gallons to 4,772,615,192 gallons, while the number of consumers has increased from 12,012 to 14.342. An increase in revenue is also noted from $229,864.04 to $261,005.44. Forming a part of the report arc tables showing the result of bacteriological examinations made by Dr. Win. I.itterer semi-monthly, and of chemical analyses made by Dr. W. H. Hollinshead monthly. These tests show the water supply to be in excellent condition, and the city has been supplied with good, clean water ever since the present treatment of the water supply began. The expenses of clarifying and purifying the water supply for the year were $13,716.87. The water main extensions during the year consisted of 37,573 feet of new mains. Included in this was a 12-inch main extending from Second avenue, North, to First street, crossing the bridge at the .Public Square. The importance of this line is not only to increase the supply in Fast Nashville, but in case of an accident to the lines passing under the river at Broadway, the East Nashville supply could he continued through the new 12-inch line over the bridge. The east basin of the reservoir was cleaned during August and required three weeks to remove the sediment, estimated at about 3,000 cubic yards. On December 31, 1910, there were 9,381 meters in use, 1,046 being set during the year. The continued introduction of meters cannot lie too highly recommended, as it not only tends to prevent careless waste of water, but causes many leaks to be discovered that would otherwise continue unnoticed, and there is no question but that it is a most equitable method of selling water. Six of the old 24-inch valves on Broadway were replaced with new valves during the year and the old ones were removed, being of obsolete pattern and in service since 1881. It became necessary to replace these valves for on several occasions it was found to be impossible to close them. The expenditures of the Waterworks Department for the year 1910 amounted to $171,176.66, of which amount $67,687 was invested in permanent improvements and betterments. Deducting this amount from the total expenses, $171,176.66, leaves $103,489.50 as the operating and maintenance expense. The revenue for the year was $261,005.44, and the expenditures were as follows: Interest on bonds. $57,361.70; improvements and betterments, $67,687.16; operating and maintenance, $103,489.50; total, $228,538.36. This leaves a balance of $324,467.08.